Article ID: 891716
The Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool is intended for use with the operating systems that are listed in the "Applies to" section. Operating systems that are not included in the list were not tested and therefore are not supported. These unsupported operating systems include all versions and editions of embedded operating systems.
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INTRODUCTION

Microsoft has released the Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool to help you remove specific, prevalent malicious software from a computer.

Skip the details and download the tool

For more information about how to download the tool, go to the following Microsoft webpage:
http://www.microsoft.com/security/pc-security/malware-removal.aspx
The information that is contained in this article is specific to the enterprise deployment of the tool. We highly recommend that you review the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article. It contains general information about the tool and about the download locations.


The tool is primarily intended for noncorporate users who do not have an existing, up-to-date antivirus product installed on their computers. However, the tool can also be deployed in an enterprise environment to enhance existing protection and as part of a defense-in-depth strategy. To deploy the tool in an enterprise environment, you can use one or more of the following methods:
  • Windows Server Update Services
  • Microsoft Systems Management Software (SMS) software package
  • Group Policy-based computer startup script
  • Group Policy-based user logon script
For more information about how to deploy the tool through Windows Update and Automatic Updates, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
890830 The Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool helps remove specific, prevalent malicious software from computers that are running supported versions of Windows
The current version of this tool does not support the following deployment technologies and techniques:
  • Windows Update Catalog
  • Execution of the tool against a remote computer
  • Software Update Services (SUS)
Additionally, the Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer (MBSA) does not detect execution of the tool. This article includes information about how you can verify execution of the tool as part of deployment.

Code sample

The script and the steps that are provided here are meant to be only samples and examples. Customers must test these sample scripts and example scenarios and modify them appropriately to work in their environment. You must change the ServerName and the ShareName according to the setup in your environment.

The following code sample does the following things:
  • Runs the tool in silent mode
  • Copies the log file to a preconfigured network share
  • Prefixes the log the file name with the name of the computer from which the tool is executed and with the user name of the current user. You must set appropriate permissions on the share according to the instructions in the Initial setup and configuration section.
REM In this example, the script is named RunMRT.cmd.
REM The Sleep.exe utility is used to delay the execution of the tool when used as a 
REM startup script. See the "Known issues" section for details.
@echo off
call \\ServerName\ShareName\Sleep.exe 5
Start /wait \\ServerName\ShareName\Windows-KB890830-V5.11.exe /q

copy %windir%\debug\mrt.log \\ServerName\ShareName\Logs\%computername%_%username%_mrt.log
Note In this code sample, ServerName is a placeholder for the name of your server, and ShareName is a placeholder for the name of your share.

Initial setup and configuration

This section is intended for administrators who are using a startup script or a logon script to deploy this tool. If you are using SMS, you can continue to the "Deployment methods" section.

To configure the server and the share, follow these steps:
  1. Set up a share on a member server. Then name the share ShareName.
  2. Copy the tool and the sample script, RunMRT.cmd, to the share. See the Code sample section for details.
  3. Configure the following share permissions and NTFS file system permissions:
    • Share permissions:
      1. Add the domain user account for the user who is managing this share, and then click Full Control.
      2. Remove the Everyone group.
      3. If you use the computer startup script method, add the Domain Computers group together with Change and Read permissions.
      4. If you use the logon script method, add the Authenticated Users group together with Change and Read permissions.
    • NTFS permissions:
      1. Add the domain user account for the user who is managing this share, and then click Full Control.
      2. Remove the Everyone group if it is in the list.

        Note If you receive an error message when you remove the Everyone group, click Advanced on the Security tab, and then click to clear the Allow inheritable permissions from parent to propagate to this object check box.
      3. If you use the computer startup script method, grant the Domain Computers group Read & Execute permissions, List Folder Contents permissions, and Read permissions.
      4. If you use the logon script method, grant the Authenticated Users group Read & Execute permissions, List Folder Contents permissions, and Read permissions.
  4. Under the ShareName folder, create a folder that is named "Logs."

    This folder is where the final log files will be collected after the tool runs on the client computers.
  5. To configure the NTFS permissions on the Logs folder, follow these steps.

    Note Do not change the Share permissions in this step.
    1. Add the domain user account for the user who is managing this share, and then click Full Control.
    2. If you use the computer startup script method, give the Domain Computers group Modify permissions, "Read & Execute" permissions, List Folder Contents permissions, Read permissions, and Write permissions.
    3. If you use the logon script method, give the Authenticated Users group Modify permissions, "Read & Execute" permissions, List Folder Contents permissions, Read permissions, and Write permissions.

Deployment methods

Note To run this tool, you must have Administrator permissions or System permissions, regardless of the deployment option that you choose.

How to use the SMS software package

The following example provides step-by-step instructions for using SMS 2003. The steps for using SMS 2.0 resemble these steps.
  1. Extract the Mrt.exe file from the package that is named Windows-KB890830-V1.34-ENU.exe /x.
  2. Create a .bat file to start Mrt.exe and to capture the return code by using ISMIF32.exe.

    The following is an example.
    @echo off
    Start /wait Mrt.exe /q
    If errorlevel 13 goto error13
    If errorlevel 12 goto error12
    Goto end
    
    :error13
    Ismif32.exe –f MIFFILE –p MIFNAME –d ”text about error 13”
    Goto end
    
    :error12
    Ismif32.exe –f MIFFILE –p MIFNAME –d “text about error 12”
    Goto end
    
    :end
    
    For more information about Ismif32.exe, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    268791 How a status Management Information Format (MIF) file produced by the ISMIF32.exe file is processed in SMS 2.0
    186415 Status MIF creator, Ismif32.exe is available
  3. To create a package in the SMS 2003 console, follow these steps:
    1. Open the SMS Administrator Console.
    2. Right-click the Packages node, click New, and then click Package.

      The Package Properties dialog box is displayed.
    3. On the General tab, name the package.
    4. On the Data Source tab, click to select the This package contains source files check box.
    5. Click Set, and then choose a source directory that contains the tool.
    6. On the Distribution Settings tab, set the Sending priority to High.
    7. On the Reporting tab, click Use these fields for status MIF matching, and then specify a name for the MIF file name field and for the Name field.

      Version and Publisher are optional.
    8. Click OK to create the package.
  4. To specify a Distribution Point (DP) to the package, follow these steps:
    1. In the SMS 2003 console, locate the new package under the Packages node.
    2. Expand the package. Right-click Distribution Points, point to New, and then click Distribution Points.
    3. Start the New Distribution Points Wizard. Select an existing Distribution Point.
    4. Click Finish to exit the wizard.
  5. To add the batch file that was previously created to the new package, follow these steps:
    1. Under the new package node, click the Programs node.
    2. Right-click Programs, point to New, and then click Program.
    3. Click the General tab, and then enter a valid name.
    4. At the Command line, click Browse to select the batch file that you created to start Mrt.exe.
    5. Change Run to Hidden. Change After to No action required.
    6. Click the Requirements tab, and then click This program can run only on specified client operating systems.
    7. Click All x86 Windows Server 2003, and All x86 Windows XP.
    8. Click the Environment tab, click Whether a user is logged in the Program can run list. Set the Run mode to Run with administrative rights.
    9. Click OK to close the dialog box.
  6. To create an advertisement to advertise the program to clients, follow these steps:
    1. Right-click the Advertisement node, click New, and then click Advertisement.
    2. On the General tab, enter a name for the advertisement. In the Package field, select the package that you previously created. In the Program field, select the program that you previously created. Click Browse, and then click the All System collection or select a collection of computers that only includes Windows XP and later versions.
    3. On the Schedule tab, leave the default options if you want the program to only run one time. To run the program on a schedule, assign a schedule interval.
    4. Set the Priority to High.
    5. Click OK to create the advertisement.

How to use a Group Policy-based computer startup script

This method requires you to restart the client computer after you set up the script and after you apply the Group Policy setting.
  1. Set up the shares. To do this, follow the steps in the Initial setup and configuration section.
  2. Set up the startup script. To do this, follow these steps:
    1. In the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in, right-click the domain name, and then click Properties.
    2. Click the Group Policy tab.
    3. Click New to create a new Group Policy Object (GPO), and type MRT Deployment for the name of the policy.
    4. Click the new policy, and then click Edit.
    5. Expand Windows Settings for Computer Configuration, and then click Scripts.
    6. Double-click Logon, and then click Add.

      The Add a Script dialog box is displayed.
    7. In the Script Name box, type \\ServerName\ShareName\RunMRT.cmd.
    8. Click OK, and then click Apply.
  3. Restart the client computers that are members of this domain.

How to use a Group Policy-based user logon script

This method requires that the logon user account is a domain account and is a member of the local administrator's group on the client computer.
  1. Set up the shares. To do this, follow the steps in the Initial setup and configuration section.
  2. Set up the logon script. To do this, follow these steps:
    1. In the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in, right-click the domain name, and then click Properties.
    2. Click the Group Policy tab.
    3. Click New to create a new GPO, and then type MRT Deployment for the name.
    4. Click the new policy, and then click Edit.
    5. Expand Windows Settings for User Configuration, and then click Scripts.
    6. Double-click Logon, and then click Add. The Add a Script dialog box is displayed.
    7. In the Script Name box, type \\ServerName\ShareName\RunMRT.cmd.
    8. Click OK, and then click Apply.
  3. Log off and then log on to the client computers.
In this scenario, the script and the tool will run under the context of the logged-on user. If this user does not belong to the local administrators group or does not have sufficient permissions, the tool will not run and will not return the appropriate return code. For more information about how to use startup scripts and logon scripts, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
198642 Overview of logon, logoff, startup, and shutdown scripts in Windows 2000
322241 How to assign scripts in Windows 2000

Additional information that is relevant to enterprise deployment

How to examine return codes

You can examine the return code of the tool in your deployment logon script or in your deployment startup script to verify the results of execution. See the Code sample section for an example of how to do this.

The following list contains the valid return codes.
Collapse this tableExpand this table
0=No infection found
1=OS Environment Error
2=Not running as an Administrator
3=Not a supported OS
4=Error Initializing the scanner. (Download a new copy of the tool)
5=Not used
6=At least one infection detected. No errors.
7=At least one infection was detected, but errors were encountered.
8=At least one infection was detected and removed, but manual steps are required for a complete removal.
9=At least one infection was detected and removed, but manual steps are required for complete removal and errors were encountered.
10=At least one infection was detected and removed, but a restart is required for complete removal
11=At least one infection was detected and removed, but a restart is required for complete removal and errors were encountered
12=At least one infection was detected and removed, but both manual steps and a restart is required for complete removal.
13=At least one infection was detected and removed, but a restart is required. No errors were encountered.

How to parse the log file

The Malicious Software Removal Tool writes details about the result of its execution in the %windir%\debug\mrt.log log file.

Notes
  • This log file is available only in English.
  • Starting with version 1.2 of the removal tool (March 2005), this log file uses Unicode text. Before version 1.2, the log file used ANSI text.
  • The log file format has changed with version 1.2, and we recommend that you download and use the latest version of the tool.

    If this log file already exists, the tool appends to the existing file.
  • You can use a command script that resembles the previous example to capture the return code and to collect the files to a network share.
  • Because of the switch from ANSI to Unicode, version 1.2 of the removal tool will copy any ANSI versions of the Mrt.log file in the %windir%\debug folder to Mrt.log.old in the same directory. Version 1.2 also creates a new Unicode version of the Mrt.log file in that same directory. Like the ANSI version, this log file will be appended to each month's release.
The following example is an Mrt.log file from a computer that was infected with the MPnTestFile worm:
Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool v5.3, August 2013 (build 5.3.9300.0)
Started On Tue Jul 30 23:34:49 2013


Quick Scan Results:
-------------------
Threat Detected: Virus:Win32/MPnTestFile.2004 and Removed!
  Action: Remove, Result: 0x00000000
    regkey://HKLM\SOFTWARE\MICROSOFT\WINDOWS\CURRENTVERSION\RUN\\v5mpn
    runkey://HKLM\SOFTWARE\MICROSOFT\WINDOWS\CURRENTVERSION\RUN\\v5mpn
    file://c:\temp\mpncleantest.exe
        SigSeq: 0x00002267735A46E2

Results Summary:
----------------
Found Virus:Win32/MPnTestFile.2004 and Removed!
Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool Finished On Tue Jul 30 23:35:39 2013


Return code: 6 (0x6)           


The following is an example log file where no malicious software is found.
Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool v5.3, August 2013 (build 5.3.9300.0)
Started On Thu Aug 01 21:15:43 2013


Results Summary:
----------------
No infection found.
Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool Finished On Thu Aug 01 21:16:28 2013


Return code: 0 (0x0)

The following is a sample log file in which errors are found.

For more information about warnings and errors that are caused by the tool, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
891717 How to troubleshoot an error when you run the Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool
Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool v5.3, August 2013 (build 5.3.9300.0)
Started On Fri Aug 02 16:17:49 2013

Scan Results:
-------------
Threat Detected: Virus:Win32/MPTestFile.2004, partially removed.
  Operation failed. Action: Clean, Result: 0x8007065E. Please use a full antivirus product ! ! 
    file://d:\temp\mpcleantest.7z->mpcleantest.exe
        SigSeq: 0x00001080D2AE29FC
    containerfile://d:\temp\mpcleantest.7z

Results Summary:
----------------
Found Virus:Win32/MPTestFile.2004, partially removed.
Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool Finished On Fri Aug 02 16:18:09 2013


Return code: 7 (0x7)

Known issues

Known issue 1

When you run the tool by using a startup script, error messages that resemble the following error message may be logged in the Mrt.log file:
Error: MemScanGetImagePathFromPid(pid: 552) failed.
0x00000005: Access is denied.
Note The pid number will vary.

This error message occurs when a process is just starting or when a process has been recently stopped. The only effect is that the process that is designated by the pid is not scanned.

Known issue 2

In some rare cases, if an administrator chooses to deploy the MSRT with the quiet switch /q (also known as silent mode), it may not completely resolve cleaning for a small subset of infections in situations where additional cleaning is required after a restart. This has been observed only in the removal of certain rootkit variants.

FAQ

Q1. When I test my startup or logon script to deploy the tool, I do not see the log files that are being copied to the network share that I set up. Why?

A1. This is frequently caused by permissions issues. For example, the account that the removal tool was run from does not have Write permission to the share. To troubleshoot this, first make sure that the tool ran by checking the registry key. Alternatively, you can look for the presence of the log file on the client computer. If the tool successfully ran, you can test a simple script and make sure that it can write to the network share when it runs under the same security context in which the removal tool was run.

Q2. How do I verify that the removal tool has run on a client computer?

A2. You can examine the value data for the following registry entry to verify the execution of the tool. You can implement such an examination as part of a startup script or a logon script. This process prevents the tool from running multiple times.
Subkey:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\RemovalTools\MRT

Entry name: Version
Every time that the tool is run, the tool records a GUID in the registry to indicate that it has been executed. This occurs regardless of the results of the execution. The following table lists the GUID that corresponds to each release.
Collapse this tableExpand this table
ReleaseValue data
January 2005E5DD9936-C147-4CD1-86D3-FED80FAADA6C
February 2005 805647C6-E5ED-4F07-9E21-327592D40E83
March 2005F8327EEF-52AA-439A-9950-CE33CF0D4FDD
April 2005D89EBFD1-262C-4990-9927-5185FED1F261
May 200508112F4F-11BF-4129-A90A-9C8DD0104005
June 200563C08887-00BE-4C9B-9EFC-4B9407EF0C4C
July 20052EEAB848-93EB-46AE-A3BF-9F1A55F54833
August 20053752278B-57D3-4D44-8F30-A98F957EC3C8
August 2005 A4066DA74-2DDE-4752-8186-101A7C543C5F
September 200533B662A4-4514-4581-8DD7-544021441C89
October 200508FFB7EB-5453-4563-A016-7DBC4FED4935
November 20051F5BA617-240A-42FF-BE3B-14B88D004E43
December 2005F8FEC144-AA00-48B8-9910-C2AE9CCE014A
January 2006250985ee-62e6-4560-b141-997fc6377fe2
February 200699cb494b-98bf-4814-bff0-cf551ac8e205
March 2006b5784f56-32ca-4756-a521-ca57816391ca
April 2006d0f3ea76-76c8-4287-8cdf-bdfee5e446ec
May 2006ce818d5b-8a25-47c0-a9cd-7169da3f9b99
June 20067cf4b321-c0dd-42d9-afdf-edbb85e59767
July 20065df61377-4916-440f-b23f-321933b0afd3
August 200637949d24-63f1-4fdc-ad24-5dc3eb3ad265
September 2006ac3fa517-20f0-4a42-95ca-6383f04773c8
October 200679e385d0-5d28-4743-aeb3-ed101c828abd
November 20061d21fa19-c296-4020-a7c2-c5a9ba4f2356
December 2006621498ca-889b-48ef-872b-84b519365c76
January 20072F9BC264-1980-42b6-9EE3-2BE36088BB57
February 2007FFCBCFA5-4EA1-4d66-A3DC-224C8006ACAE
March 20075ABA0A63-8B4C-4197-A6AB-A1035539234D
April 200757FA0F48-B94C-49ea-894B-10FDA39A7A64
May 200715D8C246-6090-450f-8261-4BA8CA012D3C
June 2007234C3382-3B87-41ca-98D1-277C2F5161CC
July 20074AD02E69-ACFE-475C-9106-8FB3D3695CF8
August 20070CEFC17E-9325-4810-A979-159E53529F47
September 2007A72DDD48-8356-4D06-A8E0-8D9C24A20A9A
October 200752168AD3-127E-416C-B7F6-068D1254C3A4
November 2007EFC91BC1-FD0D-42EE-AA86-62F59254147F
December 200773D860EC-4829-44DD-A064-2E36FCC21D40
January 2008330FCFD4-F1AA-41D3-B2DC-127E699EEF7D
February 20080E918EC4-EE5F-4118-866A-93f32EC73ED6
March 200824A92A45-15B3-412D-9088-A3226987A476
April 2008F01687B5-E3A4-4EB6-B4F7-37D8F7E173FA
May 20080A1A070A-25AA-4482-85DD-DF69FF53DF37
June 20080D9785CC-AEEC-49F7-81A8-07B225E890F1
July 2008BC308029-4E38-4D89-85C0-8A04FC9AD976
August 2008F3889559-68D7-4AFB-835E-E7A82E4CE818
September 20087974CF06-BE58-43D5-B635-974BD92029E2
October 2008131437DE-87D3-4801-96F0-A2CB7EB98572
November 2008F036AE17-CD74-4FA5-81FC-4FA4EC826837
December 20089BF57AAA-6CE6-4FC4-AEC7-1B288F067467
December 20089BF57AAA-6CE6-4FC4-AEC7-1B288F067467
January 20092B730A83-F3A6-44F5-83FF-D9F51AF84EA0
February 2009C5E3D402-61D9-4DDF-A8F5-0685FA165CE8
March 2009BDEB63D0-4CEC-4D5B-A360-FB1985418E61
April 2009276F1693-D132-44EF-911B-3327198F838B
May 2009AC36AF73-B1E8-4CC1-9FF3-5A52ABB90F96
June 20098BD71447-AAE4-4B46-B652-484001424290
July 2009F530D09B-F688-43D1-A3D5-49DC1A8C9AF0
August 200991590177-69E5-4651-854D-9C95935867CE
September 2009B279661B-5861-4315-ABE9-92A3E26C1FF4
October 20094C64200A-6786-490B-9A0C-DEF64AA03934
November 200978070A38-A2A9-44CE-BAB1-304D4BA06F49
December 2009A9A7C96D-908E-413C-A540-C43C47941BE4
January 2010ED3205FC-FC48-4A39-9FBD-B0035979DDFF
February 201076D836AA-5D94-4374-BCBF-17F825177898
March 2010076DF31D-E151-4CC3-8E0A-7A21E35CF679
April 2010D4232D7D-0DB6-4E8B-AD19-456E8D286D67
May 201018C7629E-5F96-4BA8-A2C8-31810A54F5B8
June 2010308738D5-18B0-4CB8-95FD-CDD9A5F49B62
July 2010A1A3C5AF-108A-45FD-ABEC-5B75DF31736D
August 2010E39537F7-D4B8-4042-930C-191A2EF18C73
September 2010 0916C369-02A8-4C3D-9AD0-E72AF7C46025
October 201032F1A453-65D6-41F0-A36F-D9837A868534
November 20105800D663-13EA-457C-8CFD-632149D0AEDD
December 20104E28B496-DD95-4300-82A6-53809E0F9CDA
January 2011258FD3CF-9C82-4112-B1B0-18EC1ECFED37
February 2011B3458687-D7E4-4068-8A57-3028D15A7408
March 2011AF70C509-22C8-4369-AEC6-81AEB02A59B7
April 20110CB525D5-8593-436C-9EB0-68C6D549994D
May 2011852F70C7-9C9E-4093-9184-D89D5CE069F0
June 2011DDE7C7DD-E76A-4672-A166-159DA2110CE5
July 20113C009D0B-2C32-4635-9B34-FFA7F4CB42E7
August 2011F14DDEA8-3541-40C6-AAC7-5A0024C928A8
September 2011E775644E-B0FF-44FA-9F8B-F731E231B507
October 2011C0177BCC-8925-431B-AC98-9AC87B8E9699
November 2011BEB9D90D-ED88-42D7-BD71-AE30E89BBDC9
December 201179B9D6F6-2990-4C15-8914-7801AD90B4D7
January 2012634F47CA-D7D7-448E-A7BE-0371D029EB32
February 2012 23B13CB9-1784-4DD3-9504-7E58427307A7
March 2012 84C44DD1-20C8-4542-A1AF-C3BA2A191E25
April 2012 3C1A9787-5E87-45E3-9B0B-21A6AB25BF4A
May 2012 D0082A21-13E4-49F7-A31D-7F752F059DE9
June 2012 4B83319E-E2A4-4CD0-9AAC-A0AB62CE3384
July 2012 3E9B6E28-8A74-4432-AD2A-46133BDED728
August 2012 C1156343-36C9-44FB-BED9-75151586227B
September 2012 02A84536-D000-45FF-B71E-9203EFD2FE04
October 2012 8C1ACB58-FEE7-4FF0-972C-A09A058667F8
November 2012 7D0B34BB-97EB-40CE-8513-4B11EB4C1BD6
December 2012AD64315C-1421-4A96-89F4-464124776078
January 2013A769BB72-28FC-43C7-BA14-2E44725FED20
February 2013ED5E6E45-F92A-4096-BF7F-F84ECF59F0DB
March 2013147152D2-DFFC-4181-A837-11CB9211D091
April 20137A6917B5-082B-48BA-9DFC-9B7034906FDC
May 20133DAA6951-E853-47E4-B288-257DCDE1A45A
June 20134A25C1F5-EA3D-4840-8E14-692DD6A57508
July 20139326E352-E4F2-4BF7-AF54-3C06425F28A6
August 2013B6345F3A-AFA9-42FF-A5E7-DFC6C57B7EF8
September 2013462BE659-C07A-433A-874F-2362F01E07EA
October 201321063288-61F8-4060-9629-9DBDD77E3242
November 2013BA6D0F21-C17B-418A-8ADD-B18289A02461
December 2013AFAFB7C5-798B-453D-891C-6765E4545CCC
January 20147BC20D37-A4C7-4B84-BA08-8EC32EBF781C
February 2014FC5CF920-B37A-457B-9AB9-36ECC218A003
March 2014​254C09FA-7763-4C39-8241-76517EF78744
April 201454788934-6031-4F7A-ACED-5D055175AF71
Q3. How can I disable the infection-reporting component of the tool so that the report is not sent back to Microsoft?

A3. An administrator can choose to disable the infection-reporting component of the tool by adding the following registry key value to computers. If this registry key value is set, the tool will not report infection information back to Microsoft.
Subkey:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\MRT

Entry name: \DontReportInfectionInformation
Type: REG_DWORD
Value data: 1


Q4. With the March 2005 release, data in the Mrt.log file appears to have been lost. Why was this data removed, and is there a way for me to retrieve it?

A4. Starting with the March 2005 release, the Mrt.log file is being written as a Unicode file. To make sure of compatibility, when the March 2005 version of the tool is run, if an ANSI version of the file is on the system, the tool will copy the contents of that log to Mrt.log.old in %WINDIR%\debug and create a new Unicode version of Mrt.log. Like the ANSI version, this Unicode version will be appended to with each successive execution of the tool.

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Article ID: 891716 - Last Review: April 8, 2014 - Revision: 117.0
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kbinfo KB891716

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