README.TXT: Microsoft Network Client version 3.0

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Summary

The following are the release notes that come with the Microsoft Network Client. The Network Client can be found on the Windows NT Server 3.51 CD in the \CLIENTS\MSCLIENT\NETSETUP directory. The release notes are in the README.TXT file.

More information

Microsoft Network Client version 3.0 for MS-DOS Release Notes

This document contains information about Microsoft(R) Network Client version 3.0 for MS-DOS(R) that wasn't available when the "Windows NT (TM) Server Installation Guide" version 3.51 was printed.

Contents

  1. Installing Network Client
  2. Setup PATH Problem With Microsoft Windows
  3. If You Have an 8088 Processor
  4. Setup Requires 429K Available Memory
  5. Setup is Slow on Some Computers
  6. Network Client Cannot Be Set Up on DoubleDisk Drive
  7. Windows 3.x Setup Network Choice
  8. If COMMAND.COM is Not in Root Directory
  9. Using INTERLNK and INTERSVR
  10. Using TSRs with Network Client
  11. Named Pipes and Enhanced Mode Windows
  12. Using Qualitas Maximize or Quarterdeck Optimize
  13. Using QEMM Lastdrive
  14. Making the Pop-up Interface Visible on a Monochrome Monitor
  15. Enabling Validated Logons to Windows NT and LAN Manager Domains
  16. Network Settings in SYSTEM.INI
  17. NWLink Supports IPX Only
  18. Installing the MS-DLC Protocol
  19. Installing Remote Access Service 1.1a
  20. Browsing the Network Requires a Windows for Workgroups or Windows NT Computer on the Network
  21. IPCONFIG.EXE and Controlling DHCP Leases
  22. Specifying WINS Servers
  23. Differences in MS-DOS TCP/IP
  24. Logging On With TCP/IP Across a Router
  25. Overview of Windows Sockets
  26. Setting DNR and Sockets Settings

1. Installing Network Client

If you are installing Microsoft Network Client version 3.0 for MS-DOS on a computer that does not have MS-DOS installed, you will get the error "No Drivers Present On This Disk" if you try to use the Windows Driver Library. You must have MS-DOS installed on the computer.

If you have a Windows NT Server floppy disk set and you want to make extra copies of Microsoft Network Client for MS-DOS, note that the installation disk for this client will only fit on a 3.5" floppy disk.

2. Setup PATH Problem With Microsoft Windows

If you have Microsoft Windows installed on your computer before you install Network Client, the Network Client Setup program may incorrectly alter the PATH line in your AUTOEXEC.BAT file.

The PATH line should include the Windows directory. Check this line after you install Network Client. If the Windows directory was removed from the PATH, add it back in.

3. If You Have an 8088 Processor

You must use the basic redirector if your computer has an 8088 processor. The full redirector is the default, so you must choose the basic redirector when you install.

4. Setup Requires 429K Available Memory

In order to run Network Client Setup, you must have 429K of available conventional memory.

5. Setup is Slow on Some Computers

On some computers, particularly those with 8088 processors, Network Client Setup may appear to pause for as long as five minutes. Do not restart your computer.

6. Network Client Cannot Be Set Up on DoubleDisk Drive

You cannot use Network Client on a Vertisoft Systems DoubleDisk drive. You must set up Network Client on another type of drive.

7. Windows 3.x Setup Network Choice

If you have installed Microsoft Network Client 3.0 and then later install Windows 3.x, the Windows Setup program asks you to choose your network type from a list. "Network Client" does not appear on the list because it is newer than Windows 3.x. Instead, choose "LAN Manager 2.1."

8. If COMMAND.COM is Not in Root Directory

Network Client will not start if your COMMAND.COM file is not in the root directory of your startup drive, unless you have a SHELL command in your CONFIG.SYS file that specifies the location of COMMAND.COM. For information about the COMMAND and SHELL commands, see your MS-DOS documentation.

9. Using INTERLNK and INTERSVR

Do not use the MS-DOS INTERLNK or INTERSVR commands with Network Client.

10. Using TSRs with Network Client

If you start any terminate-and-stay-resident programs (TSRs) and you are using the basic redirector, you might be unable to unload the basic redirector.

11. Named Pipes and Enhanced Mode Windows

Asynchronous named pipes are not supported on Microsoft Network Client when the client is running under enhanced mode Windows. All other client APIs are supported, including NetBIOS, TCP/IP, and IPX/SPX.

12. Using Qualitas Maximize or Quarterdeck Optimize

In some rare situations, Qualitas(R) Maximize and Quarterdeck(R) Optimize may attempt to load some Network Client commands into the upper memory area. If this causes problems, use Maximize or Optimize in manual mode and do not use it to load Network Client commands into the upper memory area. Network Client automatically loads its commands into the upper memory area, if there is enough space. For information about using manual mode, see your Maximize or Optimize documentation.

13. Using QEMM Lastdrive

If you add drive letters by using QEMM(R) Lastdrive, and then use Network Client to connect to one of them, the connection will be successful but no information about the shared resources on it will be displayed.

14. Making the Pop-up Interface Visible on a Monochrome Monitor

To make the Network Client pop-up interface appear in monochrome mode, type MODE MONO at the MS-DOS command prompt before you display the pop-up interface, or include the MODE MONO command in your AUTOEXEC.BAT file.

15. Enabling Validated Logons to Windows NT Server and LAN Manager Domains

You must run the Network Client full redirector to have your user name and password validated by a Microsoft Windows NT Server or LAN Manager server.

16. Network Settings in SYSTEM.INI

The [Network] section of your SYSTEM.INI file contains the following settings:

  filesharing=    Does not apply to Network Client.

  printsharing=   Does not apply to Network Client.

  autologon=      Determines whether Network Client will automatically
                  prompt you for logon when it starts.

  computername=   The name of your computer.

  lanroot=        The directory in which you installed Network Client.

  username=       The username used by default at logon.

  workgroup=      The workgroup name.  Note that this may be different
                  from the "logondomain" setting.

  reconnect=      Determines whether Network Client restores previous
                  connections when it starts.

  dospophotkey=   Determines the key you press (with CTRL+ALT) to start
                  the pop-up interface. The default is N, meaning that you
                  press CTRL+ALT+N.

  lmlogon=        Determines whether Network Client prompts you for a
                  domain logon when you log on. Set this to 1 if you need
                  to log on to a Windows NT Server or LAN Manager domain.

  logondomain=    The name of the Windows NT Server or LAN Manager
                  domain.

  preferredredir= The redirector that starts by default when you
                  type the NET START command.
 
  autostart=      If you choose a network adapter during setup, and specify
                  the startup option Run Network Client Logon, autostart
                  determines which redirector you are using. If you select
                  No Network Adapter from the adapter list, or Do Not Run
                  Network Client from the startup options, autostart has
                  no value, but the NET START command still appears in
                  your AUTOEXEC.BAT file.
 
  maxconnections= Does not apply to Network Client.
				

17. NWLink Supports IPX Only

The NWLink protocol shipped with Microsoft Network Client supports only IPX. SPX is not supported.

18. Installing the MS-DLC Protocol

If you install the MS-DLC protocol, you must edit the AUTOEXEC.BAT file to add "/dynamic" to the NET INITIALIZE line. The line should be:
net initialize /dynamic

If one does not already exist, add a NETBIND line after all lines in AUTOEXEC.BAT that load network drivers. The line should simply be:
netbind

19. Installing Remote Access Service 1.1a

To use RAS, you must use the Network Client full redirector.

After creating the RAS 1.1a disks, run the Network Client Setup program. Do not use the setup program provided with RAS 1.1a to configure your network settings.
  1. In the Network Client directory, run SETUP.EXE.
  2. Choose Change Network Settings, and then select Add Adapter.
  3. Select Microsoft Remote Network Access Driver from the list of adapters, and then choose The Listed Options Are Correct.
  4. After running Setup, run the RASCOPY.BAT batch file. It will prompt you for the Remote Access Service disk 1 and disk 2.
To disable remote access, remove Microsoft Remote Network Access Driver from the list of adapters. To re-enable it, follow steps 1 through 3.

When the Remote Access files are installed, a RAS directory is created in your Network Client directory. Use the SETUP.EXE program in this directory only to configure your modem, not to configure network settings. In particular, do not select Enable Remote Access or Remove Remote Access when running SETUP.EXE from the RAS directory.

20. Browsing the Network Requires a Windows for Workgroups or Windows NT Computer on the Network

Network Client does not provide a browse master. In order for you to browse the network, a browse master must be present. Therefore, a computer running Windows for Workgroups or Windows NT must be on the network and belong to the same workgroup as the computer running Network Client. See the Windows for Workgroups 3.11 Resource Kit for information on making the Windows for Workgroups machine a browse master.

Note that this does not prevent you from connecting to a shared resource. You will just need to know the name of the server and share beforehand in order to connect to it.

21. IPCONFIG.EXE and Controlling DHCP Leases

The IPCONFIG.EXE utility provides DHCP configuration information. The version of IPCONFIG.EXE provided with the Microsoft Network Client does not support command-line switches for controlling DHCP address leases; you must use the DHCP Administration Utility instead.

Specifically, the Network Client IPCONFIG.EXE utility does not support the following switches, which are available in the IPCONFIG.EXE utilities for Windows for Workgroups and for Windows NT:
IPCONFIG /release
IPCONFIG /renew
IPCONFIG /?
IPCONFIG /all

22. Specifying WINS Servers

If your MS-DOS client uses DHCP (the default setting for MS-DOS TCP/IP), it will automatically receive the address for the WINS server. If you want to statically configure your WINS server IP address, you must edit the client's PROTOCOL.INI file and add the IP address into the [TCPIP] section.

For example, if you have 2 WINS servers available, add them into the [TCPIP] section as shown in the example below. Note that there are no dots (.) in the IP addresses.
[TCPIP]

WINS_SERVER0 = 11 101 13 53 WINS_SERVER1 = 11 101 12 198

Name queries will be sent to the WINS servers in the order in which they appear in the .INI file. The IPCONFIG command may show a different order of WINS servers (or even different WINS servers altogether) -- these are the WINS server names sent by DHCP, and the PROTOCOL.INI settings override them.

23. Differences in MS-DOS TCP/IP

There is a difference in functionality available in TCP/IP for Windows for Workgroups, and Windows NT Workstation and Server, versus MS-DOS TCP/IP. Specifically, an MS-DOS TCP/IP client does not:
support DNS resolution using WINS
support WINS resolution using DNS
register its name with the WINS database; it does queries only
act as a WINS proxy node
have multihomed support
support IGMP

24. Logging On With TCP/IP Across a Router

If the domain controller is across a router from the Network Client computer, you must add a line to the client's LMHOSTS file for logons to be validated. The line is of the following form:

www.xxx.yyy.zzz SRV_NAME #DOM:DOM_NAME

where

www.xxx.yyy.zzz is the IP address of the domain controller SRV_NAME is the NetBIOS name of the domain controller DOM_NAME is the name of the domain

You must also ensure that the domain controller can contact the client, using one of the following methods:
Enter the client's IP address and name in the domain controller's LMHOSTS file.

Register the client with a WINS server that is accessible by the domain controller. (Network Client computers do not automatically register with WINS servers; they only query the WINS servers.)

Use the LAN Manager 2.1a (and higher) "TCP/IP Extensions for LAN Manager," a hub/node service that runs on LAN Manager servers to integrate domains across routers.

25. Overview of Windows Sockets

Microsoft TCP/IP includes support for Windows Sockets on Microsoft Windows and Workgroups for Windows workstations. A socket provides an end point to a connection; two sockets form a complete path. A socket works as a bi-directional pipe for incoming and outgoing data. The Windows Sockets API is a networking API tailored for use by programmers using the Microsoft Windows operating system. Windows Sockets is a public specification based on Berkeley UNIX sockets and aims to:
  • Provide a familiar networking API to programmers using Windows or UNIX.
  • Offer binary compatibility between heterogeneous Windows-based TCP/IP stack and utilities vendors.
  • Support both connection-oriented and connectionless protocols.

If you are running an application that uses Windows Sockets, be sure to enable Windows Sockets when you configure Microsoft TCP/IP. If you are unsure whether any of your applications use Windows Sockets, refer to the documentation included with that vendor's application.

==========================================================================

= PLEASE NOTE: Step 26 following this comment is incorrect. The article = = Was simply intended to publish the contents of the README.TXT. = = Although Step 26 is in the README.TXT please reference 128751 - "No = = "Advanced" button in Client TCP/IP Configuration Box" for further = = information =

==========================================================================

26. Setting DNR and Sockets Settings

If you specify the MS TCP/IP protocol during setup, you will now see an additional dialog box after you have used the Advanced button in the MS-TCP/IP Configuration dialog box. This new dialog box, DNR and Sockets Settings, is used only if your MS TCP/IP network has a domain name service (DNS) server. If your network has a DNS and you choose to configure the Domain Name Resolver (DNR) parameters, the DNR module will be loaded with your sockets and Telnet applications to resolve hostname-to-IP address mappings. This allows you to specify remote computers by computername without knowing specific IP addresses. If you use this dialog box, these are the values you will need to supply:

Username
Your username.

Hostname
The computername your workstation will report when using the remote services. The default is your LAN Manager computername.

Primary Nameserver IP Address
The IP address of the DNS server you want the DNR to consult first when resolving computername-to-IP address mappings.

If you use DHCP, the DHCP server typically provides a DNS server address automatically; you can leave this entry blank. If you do specify an address here, it overrides the address provided by DHCP.

Secondary Nameserver IP Address
The IP address of the DNS server you want the DNR to consult when resolving computername-to-IP address mappings if the request to the primary nameserver fails.

If you use DHCP, the DHCP server typically provides a DNS server address automatically; you can leave this entry blank. If you do specify an address here, it overrides the address provided by DHCP.

Domain Name Suffix
The suffix appended to any computername for DNS processing. Your network administrator can tell you what to enter here.

Enable Windows Sockets
Mark this checkbox if you want Sockets to be invoked from the AUTOEXEC.BAT file.

Number of Sockets
The maximum number of sockets that can be made available to applications at any one time. The range is 1 to 22 sockets.

Note: Some applications may use more than one socket to provide a service. Consider this when trying to maximize available memory. The total number of sockets and NetBIOS sessions combined must not exceed 22.

Properties

Article ID: 135465 - Last Review: June 22, 2014 - Revision: 3.0
Keywords: 
KB135465
Retired KB Content Disclaimer
This article was written about products for which Microsoft no longer offers support. Therefore, this article is offered "as is" and will no longer be updated.

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