OFF97: How to Create and Use a Global Array in VBA Procedures

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Article ID: 170721 - View products that this article applies to.
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SUMMARY

In Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications, you can create a dimensioned array, such as A(6,6), that is available to all procedures in all modules.

This article includes sample Visual Basic for Applications routines that demonstrate how this can be accomplished.

MORE INFORMATION

Microsoft provides programming examples for illustration only, without warranty either expressed or implied, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and/or fitness for a particular purpose. This article assumes that you are familiar with the programming language being demonstrated and the tools used to create and debug procedures. Microsoft support professionals can help explain the functionality of a particular procedure, but they will not modify these examples to provide added functionality or construct procedures to meet your specific needs.
If you have limited programming experience, you may want to contact a Microsoft Certified Partner or Microsoft Advisory Services. For more information, visit these Microsoft Web sites:

Microsoft Certified Partners - https://partner.microsoft.com/global/30000104

Microsoft Advisory Services - http://support.microsoft.com/gp/advisoryservice

For more information about the support options that are available and about how to contact Microsoft, visit the following Microsoft Web site:http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=fh;EN-US;CNTACTMS To share an array across procedures use one of the following methods.

Method 1: Use the ParamArray(parameter array) feature

You can use a parameter array to pass an array of arguments to a procedure. You don't have to know the number of elements in the array when you define the procedure. You use the ParamArray keyword to denote a parameter array. You must declare the array as an array of type Variant, and it must be the last argument in the procedure definition.

The following example shows how you might define a procedure with a parameter array.
      Sub AnyNumberArgs(strName As String, ParamArray intScores() As Variant)
      Dim intI As Integer

      ' Use UBound function to determine upper limit of array.
      For intI = 0 To UBound(intScores())
         MsgBox strName & "'s Scores: " & intScores(intI)
      Next intI
   End Sub
				
The following examples show how you can call this procedure.
   Sub CallParamArrayRoutine

      AnyNumberArgs "Jamie", 10, 26, 32, 15, 22, 24, 16

      AnyNumberArgs "Kelly", "High", "Low", "Average", "High"

   End Sub
For more information about ParamArray, from the Visual Basic Editor, click the Office Assistant, type ParamArray, click Search, and then click to view "Understanding Parameter Arrays."

NOTE: If the Assistant is hidden, click the Office Assistant button on the Standard toolbar. If the Assistant is not able to answer your query, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
176476 OFF: Office Assistant Not Answering Visual Basic Questions

Method 2: Declare(dimension) the array as Public

The following sample Visual Basic for Applications procedures demonstrate how to share an array across procedures within the same application.

  1. Type the following lines of sample code in the General Declarations section of a project module:
          ' Dimension MyArray as Public and
          ' as a String variable array.
          Public MyArray(1) as String
    
          Sub FillArray()
             ' Fill the array MyArray with values.
             MyArray(0) = "Hi"
             MyArray(1) = "Bye"
    
             ' Call the DisplayArray Sub procedure to display MyArray.
             DisplayArray
          End Sub
    
          Sub DisplayArray()
             ' Display the values contained in the array MyArray.
             For i = 0 to Ubound(MyArray, 1)
                MsgBox MyArray(i)
             Next
          End Sub
    						
  2. Run the FillArray Sub procedure.
For more information about declaring as Public, from the Visual Basic Editor, click the Office Assistant, type Public, click Search, and then click to view "Public Statement."

NOTE: If the Assistant is hidden, click the Office Assistant button on the Standard toolbar. If the Assistant is not able to answer your query, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
176476 OFF: Office Assistant Not Answering Visual Basic Questions
For additional information, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
173707 OFF97: How to Run Sample Code from Knowledge Base Articles

REFERENCES

For more information about getting help with Visual Basic for Applications, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
163435 VBA: Programming Resources for Visual Basic for Applications

Properties

Article ID: 170721 - Last Review: January 20, 2007 - Revision: 4.5
APPLIES TO
  • Microsoft Word 97 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft PowerPoint 97 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Excel 97 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Access 95 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Access 97 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Office 97 Standard Edition
Keywords: 
kbcode kbconversion kbconvert kbdtacode kbhowto kbmacroexample kbprogramming KB170721
Retired KB Content Disclaimer
This article was written about products for which Microsoft no longer offers support. Therefore, this article is offered "as is" and will no longer be updated.

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