INF: Order of Installation for SQL Server 7.0 Clustering Setup

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SUMMARY

This article also applies to Microsoft Windows 2000 Datacenter Server, but only if it is a two-node cluster. Microsoft SQL Server 7.0 does not support more than two nodes.

For additional information, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
274446 INF: Upgrade to a SQL Server 2000 Failover Solution Recommended for all non-SQL Server 2000 Virtual Servers

SQL Server 7.0 is not supported in Windows Server 2003. For additional information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
329329 PRB: Windows Server 2003 Support for SQL Server 2000

Microsoft SQL Server 7.0 does not support the installation of a virtual server unless the installation is initiated from the console of the primary node of the virtual SQL Server being installed. Use of Microsoft Terminal Services or Remote Desktop is not supported, nor is use of a third party remote installation package for the installation of SQL Server 7.0 Failover Clustering.

When you set up a new installation of Microsoft SQL Server 7.0 Enterprise Edition for clustering, you must install applications in a specific order. This article describes the procedure you use to install multiple Microsoft products for use in a Microsoft cluster environment that includes Microsoft Internet Information Server (IIS), Microsoft Cluster Server, Microsoft SQL Server 7.0 Enterprise Edition, Microsoft Distributed Transaction Coordinator (MSDTC) 2.0, and optionally the Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack.

Warning: Failure to install the applications in the order listed in this article may cause the software to fail on installation. It might also require you to reformat the disk and start the installation process over again.

For detailed information about how to install SQL Server 7.0, Enterprise Edition on Microsoft Cluster Server, visit the following Web site for a downloadable Word version of the document "How to Install SQL Server 7.0, Enterprise Edition on Microsoft Cluster Server: Step by Step Instructions":
http://download.microsoft.com/download/sql70/file/cluster/win98/en-us/70clstr.exe


An online version of this document is also available. To download the online version, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/842192
Important: The information in this article takes precedence over the information included in the "How to Install SQL Server 7.0, Enterprise Edition on Microsoft Cluster Server: Step by Step Instructions" white paper.

SQL Server Clustering Models

Active/Active: High-Availability Solution with Static Load Balancing - Dual Virtual SQL Server Configuration

This model provides high availability and acceptable performance when only one node is online. It provides high performance when both nodes are online. With this model, you can maximize the use of your hardware resources.

In this model, each of the two nodes makes its own set of resources available to the network in the form of virtual servers that clients can detect and access. The capacity for each node is chosen so that the resources on each node run at optimum performance, but also so that either node can temporarily take the burden of running the resources from the other if a failover occurs. Depending on the resource and server capacity specifications, all client services can remain available during failover;however, performance might suffer.

Each node of the two-node cluster can support an active Microsoft SQL Server service. If a node fails, the remaining node takes ownership of the shared SCSI disks and restarts the implementation of SQL Server that has failed over. You must have four SQL Server licenses to run Symmetric Virtual Server (SVS) in an Active/Active environment.

Active/Passive: "Hot Spare" Solution with Maximum Availability - Single Virtual SQL Server Configuration

This model provides the maximum availability and performance for your resources, but it requires an investment in hardware that is not in use most of the time.

One node, referred to as a primary node, supports all clients, while its companion node is idle. The companion node is a dedicated "hot spare", ready for use whenever a failover occurs. If the primary node fails, the hot spare node immediately picks up all operations and continues to service clients at a rate of performance that is close or equal to that of the primary node. The exact performance depends on the capacity of the hot spare node.

SQL Server can be configured to run a single Active/Passive virtual SQL Server on a Microsoft Cluster Server (MSCS) cluster. This configuration gives applications resiliency to failure but requires only a single server that is running SQL Server. One node is used as the primary node for the Symmetric Virtual Server (SVS), and the other node is the hot-standby backup. The backup node can run the customer application, or be idle, acting as insurance in case of a failure. You must have two SQL Server licenses to run SVS, even when you only use one computer that runs SQL Server.

Note: When this document was written, Microsoft Message Queue Server (MSMQ) 1.0 Site Controllers could not be installed by using SQL Server 7.0 on a cluster.

This does not affect the installation of MSMQ 1.0 Routing Servers, Independent Clients, or Dependent Clients.

There is a known problem when you try to install a MSMQ Primary Site Controller (PSC) on a cluster. For more information, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
188685 HOWTO: Install an MSMQ PSC on Microsoft Cluster Server

MORE INFORMATION

Steps for Correct Installation

Order of Installation using Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 Enterprise Edition

Warning: You must install Microsoft Cluster Server (MSCS) completely on at least one node before you run Microsoft Windows NT Server, Enterprise Edition at the same time on both nodes. When you use MSCS, it is critical that one node be in control of the shared SCSI bus before the other node comes online. Failure to do so may cause the application failover to go in an "Online Pending" state, and either not ever failover to the other node, or completely fail.
  1. Install Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 Enterprise Edition. This product includes Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 3.

    Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 3 is must have required to complete the Windows 4.0 Enterprise Edition installation. Do not install Service Pack 4 (or later) for Windows NT if you intend to install the Windows NT Option Pack. Do not install Internet Information Server (IIS) during the installation of Windows NT. By default, IIS is installed and Microsoft recommends that you clear the IIS option during the Windows NT install process to prevent the installation of IIS.
  2. Install Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.01 or later. Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.01 is included on the Microsoft Windows NT Service Pack 4 CD. It is on the second CD that is included with SQL Server 7.0, Enterprise Edition.

    Warning: Do not install Microsoft Windows NT Service Pack 4 now.
  3. Create a domain user account for the service account for SQL Server. If you already have a domain user account, verify its policies so that it has been granted the right to:

    1. Act as part of the operating system.
    2. Logon as a service.
    3. Logon locally.
    Make sure that it is part of the local Administrators group on both nodes.

    Warning: If you later find that you must change the SQL Server service accounts on a clustered SQL Server (SQL Virtual Server) you must perform the change in this order:

    1. Make sure that the SQL Virtual Servers resource group is owned by the node where it was initially installed.
    2. Run the Cluster Failover Wizard and select the option to remove the SQL Virtual Server.
    3. Change the service accounts for the MSSQLServer and/or the SQLServerAgent to the account that you want. This account must still meet the criteria discussed earlier.
    4. Run the Cluster Failover Wizard to add the SQL Virtual Server back.
  4. Next, install Microsoft Cluster Server (MSCS). Other application installation options are presented with the Windows NT 4.0, Enterprise Edition installation.

    Note: Do not select Microsoft Message Queue Server (MSMQ) or IIS. MSMQ 1.0 is not supported on clustered SQL Server 7.0.
  5. Install the Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack if you are using Windows NT 4.0, Enterprise Edition. Do not select MSMQ as an optional installation choice.

    Important: The Windows NT Option Pack installation is optional. Install it only if you must have the specific programs contained in the Windows NT Option Pack. Microsoft recommends that you use IIS functionality with Windows NT Load Balance Service (WLBS) clustering. For additional information, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

    223258 How to Install the Windows NT Option Pack on MSCS 1.0 with SQL Server 6.5 or 7.0
    For more detail, visit the following white paper:

    How to Install Windows NT Option Pack on a Cluster
  6. If the Windows NT Option Pack was not installed on Windows NT 4.0 Enterprise Edition, manually create the cluster resources for MSDTC to use in the SQL Server Cluster group that contains the cluster drive that SQL Server will use. The MSDTC resources that are required are a unique IP address, and a Network name. If MSDTC is already clustered, the SQL Server Setup program will use the existing installation.
  7. Note If SQL Server 7.0 is already clustered and it is the first group to meet this criterion, MSDTC will use the first resources that it finds in that group, including SQL Server or other existing resources or MSDTC resources.

    Note: These resources must not be the same ones you will use for your clustered SQL Server. The resources must be unique.

    Warning: When you stop services, make sure that any currently clustered services that you must stop are taken offline from the Cluster Administrator.

    1. Switch all services to Manual mode; however, do not touch the following services (if present):

      • Alerter
      • Cluster Service
      • Computer Browser
      • Event Log
      • Kerberos Key Distribution Center (if servers are DCs)
      • License Logging Service
      • Messenger
      • Net Logon
      • NTLM Security Support Provider
      • Network Connectors
      • Plug and Play
      • Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Locator
      • Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Service
      • Remote Registry Service
      • Server
      • Print Spooler
      • TCP/IP NetBIOS Helper
      • Time Service
      • Workstation

      Note: Some installations may not have all these services, because this list covers both Windows NT 4.0 Enterprise Edition and Windows 2000 Advanced Server.

    2. Close Control Panel, and then restart the server. This clears the memory of DLLs loaded by services; otherwise, these services would remain in memory and hold locks on system resources.
  8. Install the Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack. When you install the service pack, make sure that you choose to create an uninstall folder, and that you use the Year 2000 setup from the CD-ROM. To do this, select to install from the choice in the frame on the right-side of the screen that appears when the CD auto runs. Microsoft recommends that you rename the hidden folder from $NTServicePackUninstall$ to $NTServicePackUninstall$.SP4
  9. Logon to both nodes in the cluster as the SQL Server Service Account you previously created or the domain user account that already exists that has the correct permissions.

    Warning: Failure to logon with the SQL Server Service Account can cause the installation to fail.
  10. Install Microsoft SQL Server 7.0 Enterprise Edition from the CD. When you install SQL Server, both the program files and the data files are installed to the cluster disk.

    For detailed information about how to install SQL Server 7.0, Enterprise Edition on Microsoft Cluster Server, visit the following Microsoft Web site for a downloadable Word version of the document "How to Install SQL Server 7.0, Enterprise Edition on Microsoft Cluster Server: Step by Step Instructions":
    http://download.microsoft.com/download/sql70/file/cluster/win98/en-us/70clstr.exe
  11. Install SQL Server 7.0 Service Pack 4.

    Warning: To install the SQL Server Administrative utilities to the second node of a active/passive installation you have to install the utility to a local drive on the second node before you perform the next step. If you do not install the SQL Server Administrative utilities now, you must uncluster SQL Server, install the SQL Server Administrative utilities, and then recluster SQL Server.
  12. Cluster SQL Server 7.0, Enterprise Edition by using the SQL Cluster Failover Wizard.
  13. Install the current Windows NT Service Pack.

    Note: Before you install Windows NT Service Packs, Microsoft recommends that you verify that your current Windows NT Service Pack remove folder has been renamed. Microsoft also recommends that you rename the hidden folder, $NTServicePackUninstall$, to $NTServicePackUninstall$.SP4 and then rename it again after installing any future Service Packs by adding .SPx as the extension, where x is the Service Pack number. This way you have uninstall directories available, if you need them. This also prevents the directories from being accidentally overwritten.

  14. Install any additional server applications required.
Warning: SQL Mail is not fully supportable when used on a SQL Server Failover Cluster because of the MAPI limitation of not being cluster-aware. Support for SQL Mail when used with clustering can only be provided on a "reasonable effort" with no guarantees of stability or availability.

Microsoft has confirmed this to be a problem in SQL Server 6.5, 7.0, and 2000 when used with failover clustering.

Order of Installation Using Microsoft Windows 2000 Overview

Warning: You must install MSCS completely on at least one node before you run Windows NT Server, Enterprise Edition at the same time on both nodes. When using MSCS, it is critical that one node be in control of the shared SCSI bus before the other node coming online. Failure to do this may cause application failover to go in an "Online Pending" state and either not ever failover to the other node or completely fail.

SQL Server 7.0 Clustering setup on Microsoft Windows 2000 Datacenter is only supported when you use a two node cluster. More than two nodes is not supported and use of the cluster wizard causes the installation to fail.
  1. Install Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server and accept the default application choices.
  2. After you install Windows 2000 on the first node (and before you install MSCS), on the Start menu, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools and then click Configure Your Server.
  3. In the Configure Your Server section, click to select Advanced\Cluster Service. In the right-hand screen, click Learn More.
  4. Review item 2 in the Windows Clustering topic. This is the type of clustering that you will set up and install for SQL Server 7.0 Enterprise Edition to use.

    Important: You must read the section about "Planning for Windows Clustering\Requirements" for server clusters and follow the Checklist for server clusters that is named "Checklist: Creating a server cluster". The checklist is in the "Server Clusters" section of the "Checklist" topic for server clusters.
  5. Install Microsoft Windows 2000 Service Pack 1 (SP1)

    .Warning: If you install Windows 2000 Service Pack 1 or later, after you cluster SQL Server, you must use the SQL Server 70Rebind.exe utility as described in the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article:
    239473 PRB: 70rebind.exe for Window 2000 and MDAC Upgrades on Clustered SQL Server 7.0 Servers
  6. Create a service account for SQL Server. If you already have one, verify its policies so that it has been granted the right to:

    1. Act as part of the operating system.
    2. Logon as a service.
    3. Logon locally.
    Make sure that it is part of the local Administrators group on both nodes.

    Note: This requires a Domain Administrators account to set up the domain policy. If you need help, visit the following Web site to read the Step-by-Step Guide to Understanding the Group Policy Feature Set:
    http://technet.microsoft.com/library/Bb742376.aspx

    Warning: If you later find that you have to change the SQL Server service accounts on a clustered SQL Server (SQL Virtual Server), you must do so in the following order:

    1. Logon to both nodes in the cluster as the SQL Server Service Account you previously created or one that exists with the correct permissions.

      Warning: Failure to logon with the SQL Service Account can cause the installation to fail.

    2. Make sure that the SQL Virtual Servers resource group is owned by the node where it was initially installed.
    3. Run the Cluster Failover Wizard and select the option to remove the SQL Virtual Server.
    4. Change the service accounts for the MSSQLServer and the SQLServerAgent, or both, to the account that you want. This account must still meet the criteria described earlier.
    5. To add the SQL Virtual Server back, run the Cluster Failover Wizard.

    Important: After you have successfully clustered Windows 2000, you must make the Microsoft Distributed Transaction Coordinator (MSDTC) cluster aware (if it is not already).

  7. From the Start menu, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools and select Cluster Administrator. In the dialog box, select View Groups\Cluster Group. The group will contain an MSDTC resource then MSDTC is already clustered. Additionally, MSDTC may have been installed to a seperate cluster group with dedicated resources. If not, complete the following two steps.
  8. From the Start menu, point to Run and enter cmd in the dialog box. Click OK.
  9. In the command line of the command prompt, type Comclust.exe, and then press Enter. This configures your MSDTC for use on the cluster. After this completes type exit and then press Enter to close the command prompt window.
  10. Repeat the two previous steps on the other node. DO NOT move any cluster resources before Comclust.exe completes on the second node.
  11. Repeat the previous step on the remaining node.
  12. Switch all services to Manual mode; however, do not touch the following services (if present):

    • Alerter
    • Cluster Service
    • Computer Browser
    • Distributed File System
    • Distributed Link Tracking Client
    • Distributed Link Tracking Server
    • DNS Client
    • Event Log
    • IPSEC Policy Agent
    • License Logging Service
    • Logical Disk Manager
    • Messenger
    • Net Logon
    • NTLM Security Support Provider
    • Network Connectors
    • Plug and Play
    • Process Control
    • Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Locator
    • Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Service
    • Remote Registry Service
    • Removable Storage
    • Security Accounts Manager
    • Server
    • Spooler
    • TCP/IP NetBIOS Helper
    • Time Service
    • Windows Management Instrumentation Driver Extensions
    • Windows Time Service
    • Workstation


    Note: Some installations may not have all these services, because this list covers both Windows NT 4.0 Enterprise Edition, and Windows 2000 Advanced Server.

  13. Close Control Panel and restart the server. This clears memory of DLLs loaded by services; otherwise, these services would remain in memory and hold locks on system resources.
  14. Install Microsoft SQL Server 7.0 Enterprise Edition from the compact disk. When you install SQL Server, both the program files and data files are installed to the cluster disk.
  15. Install SQL Server 7.0 Service Pack 3.Warning: To install the SQL Server Administrative utilities to the second node of a active/passive installation, you have to install the utility to a local drive on the second node before you perform the next step. Failure to install the SQL Server Administrative utilities now means you have to uncluster SQL Server, install the SQL Server Administrative utilities, and then recluster SQL Server.

  16. Verify that only the minimum services are started as previously listed. One additional program may now be started. Check your Taskbar for the SQL Server Service Manager. If you find the SQL Server Service Manager, right-click it, and then select Exit.Note: Microsoft has confirmed this to be a problem in Microsoft Windows 2000.

  17. Cluster SQL Server 7.0, Enterprise Edition by using the SQL Server Cluster Failover Wizard.
  18. Install any additional server products before installing any user applications.
Clear the System Event Logs in both nodes, restart the nodes, and then view the System Event Logs again. Resolve any errors before you continue.

Warning: SQL Mail is not fully supportable when used on a SQL Server Failover Cluster because of the MAPI limitation of not being cluster-aware. Support for SQL Mail when used with clustering can only be provided on a "reasonable effort" with no guarantees of stability or availability.

Microsoft has confirmed this to be a problem in SQL Server 6.5, 7.0, and 2000 when used with failover clustering.

SQL Server Service Pack Installations

When you install service packs to clustered SQL Server servers you MUST uncluster all clustered SQL Server servers on the cluster before you install the service pack. Running the SQL Server Cluster Wizard on a clustered SQL Server server provides you with the option to remove the virtual server you created. After you apply the SQL Server service pack you may then run the SQL Server Cluster Wizard to re-cluster SQL Server.

REFERENCES

For additional MSCS resource information, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

259267 Microsoft Cluster Service Installation Resources

Properties

Article ID: 219264 - Last Review: February 21, 2014 - Revision: 7.4
APPLIES TO
  • Microsoft SQL Server 7.0 Enterprise Edition
  • Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0 Enterprise Edition, when used with:
    • Microsoft Windows NT version 4.0 Option Pack
  • Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 4, when used with:
    • Microsoft Windows NT version 4.0 Option Pack
  • Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 5, when used with:
    • Microsoft Windows NT version 4.0 Option Pack
  • Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 6, when used with:
    • Microsoft Windows NT version 4.0 Option Pack
  • Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 6a, when used with:
    • Microsoft Windows NT version 4.0 Option Pack
  • Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server
Keywords: 
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbdownload kbinfo kbinterop kboswin2000 kboswinnt400 kbsetup KB219264

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