Users Can Log On Using User Name or User Principal Name

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Article ID: 243280 - View products that this article applies to.
This article was previously published under Q243280
Notice
This article applies to Windows 2000. Support for Windows 2000 ends on July 13, 2010. The Windows 2000 End-of-Support Solution Center is a starting point for planning your migration strategy from Windows 2000. For more information see the Microsoft Support Lifecycle Policy.
Notice
This article applies to Windows 2000. Support for Windows 2000 ends on July 13, 2010. The Windows 2000 End-of-Support Solution Center is a starting point for planning your migration strategy from Windows 2000. For more information see the Microsoft Support Lifecycle Policy.
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SUMMARY

Users can logon to a Windows 2000 domain using two different logon names. For example, you can use your down-level user logon name (such as my_name) or your User Principal Name (UPN) such as my_name@my_domain_name.

Your User Logon Name

This is the User Principal Name (UPN) to log on to a Windows 2000 domain. The UPN is comprised of a logon name and the UPN suffix that must be appended to the name (the text following the @ symbol). The UPN must be unique within the forest.

By default, the user has a UPN suffix of "@domain_name". If multiple UPN suffixes are available, you can choose the desired UPN suffix from the list of UPN suffixes.

Example A - One User in One Domain

Joe S. User is a user in the domain named mydomain.com. The down-level name of mydomain.com is mydomain.
First name: Joe
Middle initial: S
Last name: User

The logon name portion of the user logon name is joeuser.
The UPN for this user is joeuser@mydomain.com.
The down-level logon name for this user is MYDOMAIN\joeuser.

Example B - Two Users in Two Different Domains in the Same Forest

Joe S. User is a user in the domain named mydomain.com. The down-level name of mydomain.com is mydomain.
First name: Joe
Middle initial: S
Last name: User

There is another user named Joe S. User. However, he is a user in the domain named childdomain.mydomain.com. Childdomain.mydomain.com is a child domain of mydomain.com, and both domains are in the same forest.
The down-level name of childdomain.com is childdomain.


First name: Joe
Middle initial: S
Last name: User

The logon name portion of the user logon name is joeuser.
The UPN for this user is joeuser@childdomain.mydomain.com.
The user's down-level logon name is CHILDDOMAIN\joeuser.

Your Down-Level User Logon Name

The user logon name is comprised of the down-level name of the domain and a logon name. Generally, the logon name portion of the UPN is the same as the logon name portion of the down-level name. However, if the user is going to use a different name to logon from computers running Microsoft Windows NT or Microsoft Windows 98/95, the logon name portion of the UPN must be unique.

Down-level user names must be unique within the forest. However, there could be multiple users with the same logon name portion of the down-level name, but with different domain names. For example, BIGDOMAIN\joeuser, OTHERDOMAIN\joeuser, NEWDOMAIN\joeuser, and so on.

Example A - One User in One Domain

Joe S. User is a user in the domain named mydomain.com. The down-level name of mydomain.com is mydomain.
First name: Joe
Middle initial: S
Last name: User
The logon name portion of the user logon name is joeuser.
The UPN for this user is joeuser@mydomain.com.
The user's down-level logon name is MYDOMAIN\joeuser.

NOTE: The logon name portion of the down-level name does not have to be the same as the logon name portion of the UPN.

Example B - Two Users in Two Different Domains in the Same Forest

Joe S. User is a user in the domain named mydomain.com. The down-level name of mydomain.com is mydomain.
First name: Joe
Middle initial: S
Last name: User
The logon name portion of the user logon name is joeuser.
The UPN for this user is joeuser@mydomain.com.
The user's down-level logon name is MYDOMAIN\joeuser.

There is another user named Joe S. User. However, he is a user in the domain named childdomain.mydomain.com. Childdomain.mydomain.com is a child domain of mydomain.com, and both domains are in the same forest.

First name: Joe
Initial: S
Last name: User
The logon name portion of the user logon name is joeuser.
The UPN for this user is joeuser@childdomain.mydomain.com.
The user's down-level logon name is CHILDDOMAIN\joeuser.
There is no conflict between the two user logon names because each user is a member of a separate domain.

Example C - Two Users with the Same Name in the Same Domain in the Same Forest

Red is an Organizational Unit (OU) in mydomain.com
Joe User is a user in the OU Red.
First name: Joe
Initial: S
Last name: User
The logon name portion of the user's logon name is joeuser
The user's UPN logon name is joeuser@mydomain.com
The user's down-level logon name is MYDOMAIN\joeuser

There is another user named Joe User. However, he is a user in the OU Blue. Blue is an OU in mydomain.com.
First name: Joe
Initial: S
Last name: User

The second Joe User's UPN cannot equal joeuser@mydomain.com because all UPNs must be unique with the forest. Also, the second Joe User's down-level logon name cannot be MYDOMAIN\joeuser, because all down-level logon names must also be unique with the forest. To permit this user to logon, a different logon name must be selected to create a unique UPN with the suffix @mydomain.

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Article ID: 243280 - Last Review: March 2, 2007 - Revision: 2.4
APPLIES TO
  • Microsoft Windows 2000 Server
  • Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server
Keywords: 
kbinfo kbnetwork KB243280

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