How to Connect to the Internet Using the Internet Connection Wizard in Windows Millennium Edition

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Summary

This article describes how to configure Windows Millennium Edition (Me) to connect to the Internet by using the Dial-Up Networking tool.

NOTE: Please read the entire article before you begin to configure Windows.

More information

Windows Me has built-in support that enables you to connect to an Internet service provider (ISP) by using a Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) or Serial Line Internet Protocol (SLIP) account. SLIP support is available with the CD-ROM version of Windows Me.

Getting Started

To connect to the Internet, you need a PPP or SLIP account, and an ISP. You need the following information from your ISP:

  • User name
  • Password
  • Local access phone number
  • Your host and domain name
  • DNS server Internet protocol (IP) address
  • Authentication technique (regardless of whether a terminal window is used)
Your ISP may also provide you with an IP address and an IP subnet mask. You only need these optional items if your provider gives you a dedicated IP address to use every time you log on to the Internet.

How to Set Up Dial-Up Networking

Before you configure your Internet connection, ensure that the Dial-Up Networking tool is installed. To do this, click Start, and then point to Settings. If the Dial-Up Networking tool is installed, the Dial-Up Networking folder is displayed. If you have a folder, go to the "How to Install TCP/IP Protocol" section later in this article.

If a Dial-Up Networking folder is not displayed, follow these steps:
  1. Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Add/Remove Programs.
  2. On the Windows Setup tab, click Communications (do not click the check box), and then click Details.
  3. Click to select the Dial-Up Networking check box, and then click OK.
  4. On the Windows Setup tab, click OK.

How to Install TCP/IP Protocol

In Windows Me, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) is installed by default when a network adapter is installed. If TCP/IP is not installed after you install Dial-Up Networking, follow these steps to install TCP/IP protocol:

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click the Network icon.
  2. On the Configuration tab, click Add, and then click Protocol.
  3. Click Add, and then in the Manufacturers box, click Microsoft.
  4. In the Network Protocols box, click TCP/IP, and then click OK.
  5. If you want to connect only to the Internet, you only require the following network components:

    • Client for Microsoft Networks
    • Dial-Up Adapter
    • TCP/IP
    To remove a component, click the component, and then click Remove.

    NOTE: You can have additional protocols bound to the dial-up adapter if you need them to connect to other Dial-Up Networking servers.
  6. When the necessary components are installed, click OK, and then restart your computer when you are prompted.
NOTE: You do not need to configure any TCP/IP settings at this time. The procedure for configuring these settings is described later in this article. The default TCP/IP settings are as follows:

  • IP address setting:Obtain an IP Address Automatically
  • WINS Configuration setting: Use DHCP For WINS Resolution
  • Installed Gateways: None
  • DNS Configuration: Disable DNS

How to Create and Configure a New Connection for PPP Accounts

NOTE: If you are using a SLIP account, please go to the "How to Create and Configure a New Connection for SLIP Accounts" section later in this article.

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Dial-Up Networking.
  2. If this is the first time you have used Dial-Up Networking, the Welcome to Dial-Up Networking wizard is initiated. If the wizard does not start, double-click Make New Connection and follow the instructions for creating a Dial-Up Networking connection.
  3. When the connection is created, an icon is displayed in the Dial-Up Networking folder that you can double-click to connect to the Internet.
If your ISP requires you to manually log on to your PPP account after you have connected, you must enable the necessary support. To enable this support, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the newly created icon in the Dial-Up Networking folder, and then click Properties.
  2. On the General tab, click Configure.
  3. On the Options tab, click to select the Bring up terminal window after dialing check box, and then click OK.
  4. On the General tab, click the Networking tab.
  5. In the Type of Dial-up Server box, click PPP: Internet, Windows 2000/NT, Windows Me, and then click to select the TCP/IP check box in the Allowed Network Protocols section. When you enable TCP/IP, you are able to connect to the Internet faster after dialing your ISP. The other options are not relevant to connecting to the Internet.
  6. Click the TCP/IP Settings button. To use resources on the Internet, type your DNS server address. You can also enter your IP address if your ISP supplied you with a fixed IP address. When you have finished entering these items, click OK.
  7. Click the Security tab, and then type your user name and password. Leave the Domain box empty. This box is used when you are dialing in to a private network.
  8. Click the Dialing tab. On this tab, you are able to choose this new connection as the default connection, specify dialing options, and select Idle Disconnect options. When you have finished, click OK.

How to Connect to Your PPP Account

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Dial-Up Networking.
  2. Double-click the Dial-Up Networking icon you created in the preceding section.
  3. In the Connect To dialog box, type your user name and password, and then click Connect.
If you have selected the Bring up terminal window after dialing check box, a terminal window is displayed in which you enter your logon information. After you type your user name and password, click Continue. The order in which you log on, and the information that you have to provide may vary for your ISP. Please contact your ISP if you have questions about the logon procedure.

How to Create and Configure a New Connection for SLIP Accounts

NOTE: If you do not have a SLIP account, you do not need to perform the steps in this section.
  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Dial-Up Networking.
  2. If this is the first time you have used Dial-Up Networking, the Welcome to Dial-Up Networking wizard is initiated. If the wizard does not start, double-click Make New Connection and follow the instructions for creating a Dial-Up Networking connection.
  3. When the connection is created, an icon is displayed in the Dial-Up Networking folder that you can double-click to connect to the Internet.
  4. Right-click the newly created icon in the Dial-Up Networking folder, and then click Properties.
  5. On the General tab, click the Networking tab.
  6. In the Type of Dial-Up Server box, click SLIP: UNIX Connection, and then click to select the TCP/IP check box in the Allowed Network Protocols section. The TCP/IP selection enables you to connect to the Internet faster after you dial your ISP. The other options are not relevant to connecting to the Internet.
  7. Click the TCP/IP Settings button. To use resources on the Internet you must enter your DNS server address. You can also enter your IP address if your Internet service provider supplied you with a fixed IP address.
  8. Click the Security tab, and then type your user name and password. Leave the Domain box empty. This box is used when you are dialing in to a private network.
  9. Click the Dialing tab. On this tab, you are able to choose this new connection as the default connection, specify dialing options, and select Idle Disconnect options. When you have finished, click OK

How to Connect to Your SLIP Account

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Dial-Up Networking.
  2. Double-click the icon you created earlier and in the Connect To dialog box, click Connect.
  3. After modem negotiation, a terminal window is displayed. Type your user name and password. You receive a message from your ISP that informs you of your IP address for the session. Most providers use a message such as "Your IP address is" or "SLIP session from ###.###.###.### to ###.###.###.###" where the second set of numbers is your IP address.

    The order in which you log on, and the information that you have to provide may vary for your ISP. Please contact your provider if you have any questions about the logon procedure.
  4. Make a note of your IP address, and then click Continue.
  5. Confirm your IP address in the SLIP Connection IP Address dialog box by entering the IP address that you noted in step four, and then click OK.

    If you are not sure what your IP address is, please contact your ISP and ask how to determine your IP address for your SLIP account.

Advantages of PPP Over SLIP

When compared to SLIP accounts, PPP accounts are faster, offer error correction, may not require you to use the terminal window to log on, and do not require you to manually enter your IP address.

Troubleshooting Tips

If you experience problems connecting to the Internet, do either of the following actions:

  • Make sure your server type is correct. For example, if you have a PPP account, make sure the server type is set to PPP, not SLIP.
  • If you have a SLIP account, make sure you enter the correct IP address when you are prompted during the logon process.
  • To make sure your Internet connection is working properly, you can attempt to connect to a known IP address by typing the following command at an MS-DOS prompt:
    ping IP address
    where IP address is a known IP address.

    If you can use the ping command to connect to a known IP address successfully, basic TCP/IP connectivity is functioning properly. Next, use a ping command to connect to a known "friendly name" instead of its IP address. To do this, type the following command at an MS-DOS prompt:
    ping friendly name
    If this works, your DNS settings are functioning properly.

Glossary

Domain Name Service (DNS)

DNS is sometimes referred to as the Bind service in BSD UNIX. DNS is a static, hierarchical name service for TCP/IP hosts. A DNS server maintains a database for resolving host names and IP addresses, which enables users of computers that are configured to query the DNS to specify remote computers by host names rather than IP addresses. DNS domains should not be confused with Windows NT networking domains.

For example, when you run the ping ftp.microsoft.com command, the DNS server that you specified is contacted, and the IP address for the site is then looked up. You are then connected to that IP address.

Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP)

PPP is an industry standard that is included in Windows Dial-Up Networking to ensure interoperability with remote access software from other vendors. It enables you to use Internetwork Packet Exchange (IPX), TCP/IP, and NetBIOS Enhanced User Interface (NetBEUI) protocols over a standard telephone line connection.

Serial Line Internet Protocol (SLIP)

SLIP is another industry standard that is included with Windows Dial-Up Networking to ensure interoperability with remote access software from other vendors. Unlike PPP, SLIP works with only one protocol. Windows works with TCP/IP over a standard telephone line connection.

Password Authentication Protocol (PAP)

PAP is an authentication method that you can use to connect to an ISP. It enables you to log on without having to use a terminal window. When you use PAP, passwords are sent over the circuit in text format. This behavior offers no protection from playback.

Challenge-Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP)

CHAP is another authentication method that you can use to connect to an ISP. It also enables you to log on without having to use a terminal window. However, it does not send passwords in text format, and it is more secure than PAP.

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Article ID: 275325 - Last Review: June 19, 2014 - Revision: 2.0
Keywords: 
kbhowto kbnetwork kbsetup KB275325
Retired KB Content Disclaimer
This article was written about products for which Microsoft no longer offers support. Therefore, this article is offered "as is" and will no longer be updated.

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