How to Troubleshoot Caller ID Issues

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Article ID: 279440 - View products that this article applies to.
This article was previously published under Q279440
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Summary

This article describes how to troubleshoot issues that may occur with the caller ID feature.

More information

The caller ID feature enables administrators to control the origin of remote access connections. You can use this feature if the underlying hardware and software support caller ID.

When this feature does not function as expected, it is necessary to identify the hardware or software components that are not providing caller ID support.

When you set dial-in security by using the caller ID feature, you specify the phone number that the user must call in from. If the user does not call in from that specific phone number, the connection attempt is rejected by the remote access server.

The caller ID feature must be supported by the caller, the phone system between the caller and the remote access server, and the remote access server. If any one of these components does not forward the caller ID information to the next component, the connection attempt does not succeed.

To determine which component is not supporting the caller ID feature, you can use one of the following log files:
  • Use a device log to determine if the phone system between the caller and the remote access server is passing caller ID information between the two systems. You can configure most modems and Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) adapters to log connection and session negotiation data, which can then be used for troubleshooting.

    For additional information, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    162694 How to Capture Modem Commands in Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000
    For example, when you adjust the properties of an Eicon Diva Pro 2.0 ISDN adapter, you can set the adapter's logging option to produce a log containing the adapter's recent activities. The section below is an excerpt from a log that contains caller ID information:
    12:50:35.388 2 1 -- Transfer Rate 64 kbit/s
    12:50:35.388 2 1 - CHI (Channel Identification) - basic rate ch 2
    12:50:35.388 2 1 - OAD (Origination Address) - '8358662'
    12:50:35.388 2 1 -- Subscriber number
    12:50:35.388 2 1 -- ISDN/telephony numbering plan (Rec. E.164)
    12:50:35.388 2 1 - CPN (Called Party Number) - '8358664'
    12:50:35.388 2 1 -- Subscriber number
    Both the calling number (origination address) and the called number (called party number) are reported in the log. This data confirms that the device received the caller ID information from the phone system. If the calling number is not present, the phone system did not pass the caller ID information to the remote access server.
  • You can use Routing and Remote Access (RRAS) tracing logs to determine if caller ID information is being passed from the modem or ISDN device to the operating system. For example, the text below is an excerpt from a RASTAPI log, which contains caller ID information:
    [996] 12:54:16:296: DwGetConnectInfo
    [996] 12:54:16:296: DwGetIDInformation
    [996] 12:54:16:296: DwGetIDInformation. 0
    [996] 12:54:16:296: SizeRequired for CallID=0
    When the SizeRequired for CallID parameter is zero, caller ID information is not passed by the modem or ISDN device. If caller ID information has been passed by the modem or ISDN device, this parameter has a positive integer value, for example:
    [996] 12:54:16:296: SizeRequired for CallID=14
    To enable the RASTAPI log on a computer running Windows 2000 Professional or Windows 2000 Server, start Netsh.exe, open a command prompt window on the remote access server for which you want to enable logging, and then type the following commands (press ENTER after each command):

    • netsh
    • ras
    • set tracing rastapi enable
    NOTE: After you enable logging, the computer logs all RRAS activity to the log file in the %SystemRoot%\Tracing\ folder.

    RRAS tracing uses system resources and hard disk space. Therefore, turn off logging when you are finished troubleshooting.

    To disable RASTAPI logging, open a command prompt window on the remote access server for which you want to disable logging, and then type the following commands (press ENTER after each command):

    • netsh
    • ras
    • set tracing rastapi disabled

Properties

Article ID: 279440 - Last Review: October 26, 2013 - Revision: 3.0
Applies to
  • Microsoft Windows 2000 Server
  • Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server
Keywords: 
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbhowto KB279440

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