How To Migrate an Existing Domain Name System Infrastructure from a BIND-Based Server to a Windows 2000-Based Domain Name System Server in Windows 2000

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SUMMARY

This step-by-step guide describes how to replace an existing Domain Name System (DNS) infrastructure with a new Windows 2000 DNS infrastructure. This includes installing the Windows 2000-based DNS server and configuring it to perform name resolution and dynamic updates, which allows resources and servers to be centrally located. In addition, zone transfers are used to migrate BIND-based server zones to the Windows 2000-based DNS server. Make sure that the following conditions exist:
  • Recommended hardware or software: the computer should be running Windows 2000 Server or Windows 2000 Advanced Server and should be a member server or domain controller in a Windows 2000 domain.
  • You must have direct access to the computer console or access through Terminal Services administration.

Installing and Configuring a Windows 2000-Based DNS Server

Before you can migrate DNS services from a DNS server that is running another DNS server implementation (such as the Berkeley Internet Name Domain [BIND] software), you must:
  • Install the Windows 2000 DNS service on a computer that is running Windows 2000 Server or Windows 2000 Advanced Server.
  • Configure the Windows 2000 DNS service.
This section describes the steps to install and configure the Windows 2000 DNS service.

Installing the Windows 2000 DNS Service Manually

Before you can configure the DNS service, you must first install the DNS service on the server. DNS is not installed by default during a normal installation of Windows 2000 Server or Windows 2000 Advanced Server. You can install DNS either during the initial installation of Windows 2000 Server or Windows 2000 Advanced Server, or after the initial installation is finished.

To install the DNS service on an existing Windows 2000 Server-based computer:
  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  2. Double-click Add/Remove Programs and then click Add/Remove Windows Components.
  3. In the Windows Component Wizard, click Networking Services in the Components list, and then click Details.
  4. In the Networking Services dialog box, click to select the Domain Name System (DNS) check box if it is not already selected, and then click OK.
  5. In the Windows Components Wizard, click Next to start Windows 2000 Setup. Insert the Windows 2000 Server installation CD-ROM into the CD drive if you are prompted to do so. Setup copies the DNS service and tool files to your computer.
  6. When Setup is complete, click Finish.
To install the DNS service during the initial installation of Windows 2000 Server or Windows 2000 Advanced Server, follow steps 3 and 4 when you are prompted to install and configure Windows components.

To function properly, a DNS server requires a forward lookup zone that hosts the locator records for the DNS server's local domain. A forward lookup zone contains information that is required to resolve names in the DNS domain. You might want to configure a reverse lookup zone that allows users to determine the name of a local resource based on its IP address.

Configuring the Windows 2000 DNS Service

To configure the Windows 2000 DNS service by using the Configure DNS Server Wizard:
  1. Click Start, point to Programs, click Administrative Tools, and then click DNS to open the DNS Server Console.
  2. In the navigation pane, click the DNS Server object for your server.
  3. Right-click the server object, and then click Configure the server to start the Configure DNS server Wizard.
  4. In the Configure DNS Server Wizard, click Next. Click one of the following (as applicable), and then click Next:
    • If this is the first DNS server in the network and you do not need to resolve names from other domains, click This is the first DNS server on this network.
    • If one or more other DNS servers will also be running on this network, or if you need to forward DNS requests to another network (such as the Internet), click One or more DNS servers are running on this network, and then type the IP address of a known DNS server.
  5. Click Yes, create a forward lookup zone, and then click Next to continue. Click Standard primary to configure this server as a primary DNS server (a primary DNS server stores a master copy of the new zone in a text file), and then click Next.
  6. Type the fully qualified domain name (FQDN) of the new zone, and then click Next.
  7. Accept the default setting to create a new file with this file name, and then click Next.
To configure a reverse lookup zone that allows users to determine the name of a local resource based on its IP address:
  1. Click Yes, create a reverse lookup zone, and then click Next.
  2. Click Standard primary to create the reverse lookup zone as a primary zone, and then click Next.
  3. In the Network ID box, type the octets that are part of the network address, in order. For example, if the server's IP address is 192.168.100.102 and the subnet mask is 255.255.255.0, type 192.168.100. Click Next.
  4. Accept the default setting to create a new zone file with the file name that is automatically selected by the wizard, and then click Next.
  5. Click Finish.

Using Zone Transfers to Migrate BIND-Based Server Zones to Windows 2000-Based DNS Servers

The process to migrate BIND-based server zones to Windows 2000 DNS servers requires the following steps:
  • Adding secondary zones to Windows 2000 DNS for all of the organization's existing zones that are hosted on BIND-based DNS servers.
  • Initiating zone transfers at the Windows 2000-based DNS server to transfer the zones from the BIND-based servers.
  • Converting these secondary zones into primary zones (after the transfers are complete).
  • Changing client configurations to point to the Windows 2000-based DNS servers.

Adding a Secondary Zone to a Windows 2000-Based DNS Server

To add a secondary zone to a Windows 2000-based DNS server:
  1. Click Start, point to Programs, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click DNS to open the DNS Management Console.
  2. In the navigation pane, expand the DNS server. Expand the Forward Lookup Zones folder.
  3. Right-click Forward Lookup Zones, and then click New Zone to start the New Zone Wizard. Click Next.
  4. Click Standard secondary to create a copy of an existing zone, and then click Next. Type the name of the secondary zone in the Name box, and then click Next.
  5. Click in the box to enter an IP address. Type the address of the DNS server that you want to copy the zone from. (At this point, the Add button is no longer unavailable.) Click Add, and then click Next.
  6. Click Finish.

Initiating a Zone Transfer for a Secondary Zone

To initiate a zone transfer for a secondary zone:
  1. Click Start, point to Programs, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click DNS to open the DNS Management Console.
  2. In the navigation pane, expand the DNS server. Expand the Forward Lookup Zones folder.
  3. Expand the Forward Lookup Zones folder, and then find the secondary zone that you want to change.
  4. Right-click the zone, and then click Transfer from master.

Changing the Zone Type

To change the zone type:
  1. Click Start, point to Programs, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click DNS to open the DNS Management Console.
  2. In the navigation pane, expand the DNS server. Expand the Forward Lookup Zones folder.
  3. Expand the Forward Lookup Zones folder, and then find the secondary zone that you want to transfer.
  4. Right-click the zone, and then click Properties. Click Change to open the Change Zone Type window.
  5. Click Standard primary, and then click OK.



REFERENCES

For more information about DNS, see:
  • The "TCP/IP Core Networking Guide" in the Windows 2000 Resource Kit, chapters 5 and 6.
  • The MCSE Training Kit, "Microsoft Windows 2000 Network Infrastructure Administration" (MS Press), chapters 7 and 8.






Properties

Article ID: 301192 - Last Review: October 24, 2013 - Revision: 2.3
APPLIES TO
  • Microsoft Windows 2000 Server
  • Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server
Keywords: 
kbnosurvey kbarchive kbdns kbenv kbhowto kbhowtomaster KB301192

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