How to Configure a SBS for Full Time Internet Access with a Single Network Adapter

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Article ID: 309633 - View products that this article applies to.
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SUMMARY

This article describes how to configure a Small Business Server (SBS) 2000-based server that has a single network adapter to use a router to access the Internet.

You can use the procedure that is described in this article to resolve the following issues:
  • The server restarts slowly during the Configuring Network Connections stage.
  • You cannot access the Internet.
  • You cannot log on to the domain.
  • Exchange Server cannot send or receive e-mail.
  • An event ID 5775 DNS deregistration error is logged.
For additional information about how to configure a server that has two network adapters to connect to a router for Internet access, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
306802 Need to Configure SBS for Full Time Internet Access with Two Network Adapters
For additional information about how to configure a server that has a single network adapter to use a dial-up connection to access the Internet, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
309652 How to Configure SBS for Internet Access by Using Modem or Dial-up Connection

MORE INFORMATION

In the configuration that is described in the "Summary" section of this article, the DNS server is the pivotal point for Active Directory and local area network (LAN) connectivity. Active Directory clients (including the server and its services) use DNS to locate domain controllers for administration and logon purposes. You must have a DNS server installed and configured for Active Directory for the associated client software to function correctly.

Because of the combination of server programs, the requirements for compatibility, and the many ways these programs can be configured, you must run SBS Internet Connection Wizard on the server. Internet Connection Wizard supports connections to virtually any ISP, regardless of the connection type-broadband, router, Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), or analog modem. You can use Internet Connection Wizard to configure Windows 2000 networking for LAN and wide area network (WAN) connections, Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server for internal and Internet e-mail, and Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server.

Server Connectivity

This article assumes that the SBS-based server has at least one network adapter that has a statically assigned Internet Protocol (IP) address. Do not configure the server as a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) client. For more information about DHCP, see the "Client Connectivity" section later in this article.

If you use a router for Internet access, the IP address on the router and the IP address on the server must be unique values on the same subnet. By default, the SBS network adapter is assigned an IP address of 192.168.16.2 and a subnet address of 255.255.255.0. This address is a private network address and on a class C subnet. By default, most routers are not configured to work in this subnet. Some routers are preconfigured to use an IP address of 192.168.0.1 and a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 (this address is also a private IP address in a class C subnet). You may have to change either the routers, the servers, or both IP address so that both addresses are on the same subnet.

The following configuration is an example of a working IP scheme for the SBS-based server and router:
  • IP address for SBS-based server: 192.168.16.2
  • Default gateway for SBS-based server: 192.168.16.1
  • Internal IP address for router: 192.168.16.1
  • Internal and SBS-based server subnet mask for the router: 255.255.255.0
To give you greater flexibility to create a working IP address scheme when you follow the procedure that is described in this article, sections of the following address settings are replaced with variables:
  • SBS-based server IP address: 192.168.X.Z
  • SBS-based server default gateway: 192.168.X.Y
  • Internal IP address of router: 192.168.X.Y
  • Internal IP address of router: 192.168.X.Y
  • Internal subnet mask of router : 255.255.255.0
The following table describes the variables that are used in these settings:

Collapse this tableExpand this table
VariableValue
XThird octet in IP address that is used by all systems on LAN between 0 and 255 (the SBS default is 16). This value must be the same on the router, the SBS-based server, the client computer, and any other devices that require an IP address on the network.
YThe router IP address, which is a unique value on the network, (a typical value is 1).
ZThe server IP address, which is a unique value on the network, (typical value is 2).
CThe client IP address, which is a unique value between 10 and 254


The following procedure describes how to configure the SBS-based server for internal and external connectivity. In this configuration, the server that is running ISA Server is not being used as a firewall; it is used only as a caching server. You can remove ISA Server from the server.

To configure the SBS-based server for internal and external connectivity:
  1. Verify DNS settings for the local area connection:
    1. Click Start, click Settings, and then click Network and Dial-up Connections.
    2. Right-click Local Area Connection, and then click Properties.
    3. Right-click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then click Properties.

      Confirm that the SBS installation has the following settings:
      • IP Address
        IP Address: 192.168.X.Z
        Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
        Default Gateway: 192.168.X.Y
      • DNS Server address
        Preferred DNS server: 192.168.X.Z
        Alternate DNS server: no settings
      IMPORTANT: Use the IP address for the server's network adapter for the preferred DNS server on the local area connection.

  2. Set the binding order:
    1. Click Start, click Settings, and then click Network and Dial-up Connections.
    2. On the Advanced menu, click Advanced Settings.
    3. View the local area connections and remote access connections in the Connections box.
    4. Use the arrow buttons to put the connections in the following order:
      • Local area connection for the network adapter
      • Remote access connections
    5. Click OK.
    6. Close the Network and Dial-up Connections window.
    7. If you are prompted to do so, restart the server.
  3. Run the Internet Connection Wizard
    1. Click Start, click Run, type icw, and then click OK.
    2. On the Welcome to the Small Business Server Internet Connection Wizard page, click Next.
    3. On the Configure Hardware page, click Router, and then click Next.
    4. On the Setup Router Connection to ISP page, type 192.168.X.Y in the Router address box, and then make sure that the My router is connected to the server via a second network adapter check box is cleared.
    5. Type the IP address that is provided by your Internet Server Provider (ISP) in the Primary DNS server address box, type the IP address that is provided by your ISP in the Secondary DNS server address box (this setting is optional), and then click Next.
    6. On the Configure Internet Mail Settings page, click SMTP for Internet mail in the Exchange Server box, click Disable POP3 electronic messaging in the POP3 box, and then click Next.

      NOTE: You can also use the Internet Connection Wizard to configure POP3; however, this procedure is not described in this article. For more information about how to configure POP3, click More Information in the Internet Connection Wizard.
    7. On the Configure Internet Domain Name page, type the registered fully qualified domain name (FQDN) that is used when you send an e-mail message (for example, domain.com), and then click Next.

      NOTE: The example in the wizard assumes that mail is sent to "user@microsoft.com"; therefore "microsoft.com" is entered. Substitute "microsoft.com" for your Internet domain name.
    8. On the Configure SMTP Server Address page, click Use domain name system (DNS) for mail delivery, and then click Next.

      NOTE: If your ISP blocks direct message delivery, e-mail messages are delivered to your ISP's mail server, which forwards these messages to their destination. If your ISP blocks direct message delivery, contact the ISP for more information.
    9. On Receive Exchange Mail page, click Do not send a signal, and then click Next.

      NOTE: You can turn on Message dequeuing if you require this functionality for mail retrieval. Before you do so, confirm this setting with your ISP.
    10. Click Finish.

Client connectivity

Automatic Client Configuration

Microsoft recommends that you use the DHCP service on either the router or the SBS-based server to the configure client. Do not configure the DHCP service on both devices; you must turn off the DHCP service on one of the devices. Microsoft recommends that you use the Windows 2000 DHCP server and that you turn off the router's DHCP server.

The following example describes a DHCP scope that works in a majority of configurations. This example assumes you are using the default setting provided with the SBS installation.

To view the DCHP scope:
  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools, click DHCP.
  2. Expand server.domain.local[192.168.X.Z], expand Scope[192.168.X.0] SBS Scope, and then expand Scope Options.

    The following settings are displayed:
    Collapse this tableExpand this table
    Option NameVendorValue
    003 RouterStandard192.168.X.Y
    006 DNS ServersStandard192.168.X.Z
    044 WINS/NBNS ServersStandard192.168.X.Z
    046 WINS/NBT Node TypeStandard0x1
If you do not currently have a scope created, create a new scope.

For additional information about how to create a new scope, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
280209 SBS: SBS 2000 DHCP Service Is Not Configured If a Second DHCP Server Is Detected on the Network
NOTE: If you use the procedure that is described in the preceding article, configure the scope range in steps 6, 7, and 9 so that they reflect the TCP/IP address values that are compatible with your router and server.

Manual Client Configuration

To manually configure client connectivity, use the following settings for network printers, clients, and other devices on your local network.

Collapse this tableExpand this table
IP Address FieldIP Address SettingNotes
IP address192.168.X.CC is a unique value for each client computer
Subnet Mask255.255.255.0
Default Gateway192.168.X.YIP address of router
Preferred primary DNS192.168.X.ZIP address of server
Alternate secondary DNSblank
Primary WINS192.168.X.ZIP address of server
Secondary WINS192.168.X.ZIP address of server


NOTE: These settings include that variables that are described in the preceding section.

REFERENCES

For additional information about the procedure that is described in this article, click the article numbers below to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
237675 Setting Up the Domain Name System for Active Directory
260362 How to Configure Active Directory on a Home Network

Properties

Article ID: 309633 - Last Review: October 30, 2006 - Revision: 1.3
APPLIES TO
  • Microsoft BackOffice Small Business Server 2000 Service Pack 1
Keywords: 
kbenv kbinfo KB309633
Retired KB Content Disclaimer
This article was written about products for which Microsoft no longer offers support. Therefore, this article is offered "as is" and will no longer be updated.

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