How to configure Web browser compatibility properties in FrontPage 2002

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SUMMARY

This article describes how to configure Web browser compatibility properties in Microsoft FrontPage 2002. Web browser compatibility properties determine what types of browsers can view your pages and what types of scripts will run correctly on your pages. You must be a member of the Administrators group on the computer to perform the procedures that are discussed in this article.

NoteThe procedures that are discussed in this article are not performed on pages that have already been created and saved. Additionally, any features that have been disabled by configuring the compatibility settings will appear dimmed in FrontPage menus or dialog boxes.

Open the Compatibility Properties

  1. Start FrontPage (if it is not already started).
  2. On the Tools menu, click Page Options.
  3. In the Page Options dialog box, click the Compatibility tab.

Edit the Compatibility properties

  1. If you leave the Browsers list set to the Custom option, you can click to select the check boxes for the options that you want under Available Technologies.
  2. To modify the Browsers setting, click the option that you want in the Browsers list. The following table lists the browser types and the features that are unavailable with each browser type.

    Note The features that are unavailable limits the types of features that you can apply to your Web pages and affects how different browsers view your pages.
    Browser Unavailable features
    Microsoft Internet Explorer only Blink
    Netscape Navigator only Marquee, video, table background picture, cell borders, and background
    Both Internet Explorer and Netscape Marquee, video, table background picture, cell borders, background, and blink
    Microsoft Web TV Marquee, video, table background picture, cell borders, background, overline, blink, small caps, all caps, and capitalize
  3. In the Browser versions list, click the browser versions that you want. The following table lists the versions and the features that are associated with that version. If an option is not available with the browser version that you select, that script type or language will not function in or with your Web pages.

    Note For descriptions of the features that are listed in the table, see the "Description of the features" section.

    Browser version Available features
    Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 and later ActiveX, VBScript, JavaScript, Java applets, DHTML, frames, CSS 1.0, CSS 2.0, VML
    Internet Explorer 4.0 ActiveX, VBScript, JavaScript, Java applets, DHTML, frames, CSS 1.0, CSS 2.0, VML downlevel image file
    Internet Explorer 3.0 ActiveX, VBScript, JavaScript, Java applets, frames, CSS 1.0, VML downlevel image file
    Netscape Navigator 5.0 and later JavaScript, Java applets, DHTML, frames, CSS 1.0, CSS 2.0, VML downlevel image file
    Netscape 4.0 JavaScript, Java applets, DHTML, frames, CSS 1.0, CSS 2.0, VML downlevel image file
    Netscape 3.0 JavaScript, Java applets, frames, VML downlevel image file
    Internet Explorer and Netscape 4.0, 5.0, and later JavaScript, Java applets, DHTML, frames, CSS 1.0, CSS 2.0, VML downlevel image file
    Internet Explorer and Netscape 3.0 JavaScript, Java applets, frames, VML downlevel image file
    Microsoft Web TV N/A

  4. The settings that you select in the Browsers list and in the Browser versions list determines whether the Servers list is available. If it is available, click the option that you want in the Servers list.

    Note By default, menu commands that are not compatible with your browser compatibility selections are not available on FrontPage menus. If you override the default setting and you enable a technology or feature that a specific browser or version does not support, the Web pages on your Web site may display incorrectly or contain errors.

Description of the features

  • ActiveX: ActiveX is an umbrella term for Microsoft technologies that permit developers to create interactive content for the World Wide Web. ActiveX is a set of language-independent interoperability technologies that permit software components that are written in different languages to work together in networked environments. The core technology elements of ActiveX are the Component Object Model (COM) and distributed COM. These technologies are licensed to The Open Group standards organization and are implemented on multiple operating systems.
  • Microsoft Visual Basic Scripting Edition (VBScript): VBScript is a subset of the Microsoft Visual Basic language. VBScript is implemented as a fast, portable, lightweight interpreter for use in Web browsers and other programs that use ActiveX Controls and Java applets.
  • JavaScript: JavaScript is a scripting language that Netscape Communications developed. It is syntactically similar to Java. However, JavaScript, is not a true object-oriented language, and has limited performance compared with Java, because it is not compiled. You must use a JavaScript-client Web browser to run JavaScript code. JavaScript is now an open standard that is known as the ECMA 262 language specification.
  • Java applet: A Java applet is a Java class that is loaded and is run by a Java program that is already running, such as a Web browser or an applet viewer. Java applets can be downloaded and run by any Web browser that can interpret Java, such as Microsoft Internet Explorer, Netscape Navigator, and HotJava. Java applets are frequently used to add multimedia effects and interactivity to Web pages, such as background music, real-time video displays, animations, calculators, and interactive games. Applets can be activated automatically when a user views a page, or they may require some action on the part of the user, such as clicking an icon in the Web page.
  • Dynamic HTML (DHTML): DHTML is a set of innovative features in Microsoft Internet Explorer version 4.0 and later that can be used to create HTML documents that dynamically change their content and interact with the user. By using DHTML, authors can provide special effects on a Web page without relying on server-side programs.
  • Cascading style sheets (CSS): A cascading style sheet is a document that contains style information that several Web pages can refer to. Styles define the appearance and formatting of content on Web pages and give authors more control over how content appears in browsers.
  • Vector Markup Language (VML): VML is a specification for editable tw-dimension vector graphics in an HTML or XML document. As an application of XML, VML uses XML tags and cascading style sheets to create and put vector graphics, such as circles and squares, in an XML or HTML document, such as a Web page. These graphics are rendered in the native operating system and can include color. They are also editable in a variety of graphics programs. The specification was submitted to the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) in 1998 by a variety of computer companies, including AutoDesk, Microsoft, Hewlett-Packard, and Macromedia.

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Article ID: 311341 - Last Review: January 3, 2005 - Revision: 4.2
APPLIES TO
  • Microsoft FrontPage 2002 Standard Edition
Keywords: 
kbconfig kbwebbrowser kbhowtomaster KB311341

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