How to Set Up a Small Network with Windows 98 Second Edition (PART 1)

Article translations Article translations
Article ID: 814235
This article is a translation from German. Any subsequent changes or additions to the original German article may not be reflected in this translation. The information contained in this article is based on the German-language version(s) of this product. The accuracy of this information in relation to other language versions of this product is not tested within the framework of this translation. Microsoft makes this information available without warranty of its accuracy or functionality and without warranty of the completeness or accuracy of the translation.
Expand all | Collapse all

On This Page

Summary

This article is Part 1 of the "Set Up a Small Network with Windows 98 Second Edition" guide. Part 1 introduces this topic.

Note To view the other topics of the "Set Up a Small Network with Windows 98 Second Edition" guide, see the Microsoft Knowledge Base articles that are listed in the "References" section of this article.

The "Set Up a Small Network with Windows 98 Second Edition" guide includes the following topics:
Part 1. Introduction

Part 2. Buying the Network Hardware

Part 3. Connecting the Computers

Part 4. Installing the Network Card

Part 5. Configuring TCP/IP Protocol

Part 6. Setting the Computer Names and Workgroups

Part 7. Sharing Folders

Part 8. Sharing a Printer

More information

Part 1. Introduction

A small network is practical for home users, and you can set one up quickly. This step-by-step guide explains exactly what you must do. It only takes one day to set up shared access to hard disks, folders, CD-ROM drives, printers, and the Internet.

Your new network can connect up to 10 workstations in a workgroup. The workgroup divides the corresponding tasks among the workstations. As a result, newer computers can provide disk space on their larger hard disks, while older computers can handle print jobs, set up Internet connections, or back up data.

In larger networks, there is a distinction between servers that provide services and clients that use these services. The computers are, therefore, specialized for their specific tasks. Your small network does not require this division of tasks. Every computer can take over server functions and at the same time use the workgroup's resources. Because all the computers have the same rights, this is known as a peer-to-peer network.
Collapse this imageExpand this image
Peer-to-peer network schematic
In a peer-to-peer network, all the computers share their resources.

References

For additional information about this topic, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
814236 How to Set Up a Small Network with Windows 98 Second Edition (PART 2)
814237 How to Set Up a Small Network with Windows 98 Second Edition (PART 3)
814238 How to Set Up a Small Network with Windows 98 Second Edition (PART 4)
814239 How to Set Up a Small Network with Windows 98 Second Edition (PART 5)
814240 How to Set Up a Small Network with Windows 98 Second Edition (PART 6)
814241 How to Set Up a Small Network with Windows 98 Second Edition (PART 7)
814242 How to Set Up a Small Network with Windows 98 Second Edition (PART 8)

Properties

Article ID: 814235 - Last Review: June 20, 2014 - Revision: 5.0
Keywords: 
kbhowto KB814235
Retired KB Content Disclaimer
This article was written about products for which Microsoft no longer offers support. Therefore, this article is offered "as is" and will no longer be updated.

Give Feedback

 

Contact us for more help

Contact us for more help
Connect with Answer Desk for expert help.
Get more support from smallbusiness.support.microsoft.com