How to troubleshoot fatal system errors in Access 2003 when Access 2003 is running on the Windows 2000 operating system

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Article ID: 825444 - View products that this article applies to.
This article applies to a Microsoft Access database (.mdb) and to a Microsoft Access project (.adp).

Moderate: Requires basic macro, coding, and interoperability skills.

For a Microsoft Access 2002 version of this article, see 294301.

For a Microsoft Access 97 version of this article, see 148424.

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SUMMARY

This article discusses the Microsoft Office 2003 Application Error Reporting tool. You can use the Application Error Reporting tool to report to Microsoft the fatal system errors that occur in Microsoft Office Access 2003.

This article discusses the causes of fatal system errors that may occur in Access 2003 when Access 2003 is running on the Microsoft Windows 2000 operating system. This article discusses general troubleshooting steps that you can use to solve the fatal system errors.

Note This is a general article. The Microsoft Knowledge Base may have a specific article that addresses the exact error that you receive. To find out if a specific article exists, search the Knowledge Base by using the exact text of the error message. For additional information about the Knowledge Base, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
http://support.microsoft.com/gp/gsssearchhelp

Use the Office Application Error Reporting tool

For most fatal errors in Access 2003, you may receive the following error message:
Microsoft Office Access has encountered a problem and needs to close. We are sorry for the inconvenience.

The information you were working on might be lost. Microsoft Office Access can try to compact and repair your open database.

Repair my open database and restart Microsoft Office Access

Please tell Microsoft about this problem.
We have created an error report that you can send to help us improve Microsoft Office Access. We will treat this report as confidential and anonymous.

What data does this error report contain?

Why should I report to Microsoft?

When you receive this error message, Access 2003 permits you to collect and to send the error information to Microsoft.

The error report contains an error signature that records information such as the application details, the module details, and the error information or the exception information. Microsoft uses the error report to improve Microsoft products.

If you have an active Internet connection when you receive the error message, you can send the error report directly to Microsoft by using the Office Application Error Reporting tool. If you report the error, the Office Application Error Reporting tool verifies whether a solution to the problem is already available. If the solution to the problem is already available, the Office Application Error Reporting tool sends the solution to you. For additional information about end user reporting and privacy, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
283768 End User Privacy Policy in Application Error Reporting
The following sections of this article describe how to determine the exact problem when you receive the error message and also how to troubleshoot the problem.

Recognize fatal system errors

Typically, a fatal system error (such as a page fault error, a Stop error, a fatal exception error, or an application exception error) may cause Access 2003 (Windows-based applications) to stop responding or to fail. In Windows 2000, the basic causes for the occurrences of the fatal errors follow:
  • Something unexpected occurs in the Windows environment. Typically, this is an improper memory address. For example, an application or a Windows component may read from a memory location or may write to a memory location that has not been allocated to the application or to the Windows component (memory that it does not own). When this problem occurs, the application or the Windows component may overwrite other program code in that area of memory, and this may cause the program code to become corrupted.
  • Parameters that are not valid have been passed between applications and the Windows environment. Parameters that are not valid may cause execution of instructions that are not valid. This may result in page faults. This problem is typically the result of the internal program code of the application incorrectly passing data that cannot be correctly interpreted by Windows or by a Windows-based application.
Note Sometimes fatal system errors may also cause the operating system to stop responding.

Because the specified causes are general, you may have to try several troubleshooting steps to find the specific cause of the error in Access 2003. The following sections of this article describe how to troubleshoot the occurrence of a fatal system error on your system.

Understand application-related problems

This section discusses Access 2003 application-related problems and application-related causes for fatal system errors in Windows 2000.

Confirmed bug in Access 2003

Sometimes a fatal system error may occur if there is a bug in an application. As a result, you may receive an error message that is similar to the following error message:

Microsoft Office Access has encountered a problem and needs to close. We are sorry for the inconvenience.

To view the error details, click What data does this error report contain?.

You can find the error information such as the file that is involved in the error and the memory offset where the error occurred.

You can find the known Access 2003 problems that may cause fatal system errors by using the phrase page fault for your search in the Knowledge Base.

Damaged database or fragmented database

If the fatal system error occurs only when you open a particular database file (.mdb) or when you use a particular database file, you can use the Compact and Repair Database utility in Access 2003 to correct the potential problems that may be caused by damage to the database file or by too much fragmentation of the database structure. To use the Compact and Repair Database utility, follow these steps:
  1. Close the database.

    Note If you are in a multi-user environment, confirm that all concurrent users have also closed the database.
  2. Exit Access 2003.
  3. Make a backup copy of the database.

    Microsoft recommends that you copy the database to another medium. The medium may be another disk drive, another backup tape, another removable disk, or another network drive.

    You must create a backup of the workgroup information file (.mdw). Access stores the preferences and the security account information for each user in this file. If you have implemented Access security and this file is lost or this file is damaged, you may not be able to start Access until you restore this file or your rebuild this file.

    You can also back up individual database objects if you create a blank database and then you import the objects that you want from the original database.
  4. Start Access 2003.
  5. Open the problem database.
  6. In the Database window, point to Database Utilities on the Tools menu, and then click Compact and Repair Database.
Note To make sure that database performance is optimal, you must regularly compact and repair your Access 2003 database.

After you use the Compact and Repair Database utility and your database still behaves unpredictably and you still receive a fatal system error either immediately or after continued use, try the additional troubleshooting steps that are described in this article. Another problem may be the cause of the page fault.


Corrupted database

If the Compact and Repair Database utility does not solve the unpredictable behavior of the Access 2003 database or the Access 2003 application-related fatal system errors, create a new database. You must import objects from the old database to the new database and then you must compile all modules in the new database.

Note Microsoft does not recommend this method if your database is a replica in a replica set. If your replica is corrupted, you must create a new replica from Design Master.

To create a new database and to import objects from the old database, follow these steps:
  1. Start Access 2003.
  2. Create a new Access 2003 database.
  3. On the File menu, point to Get External Data, and then click Import.
  4. In the Import dialog box, click Microsoft Office Access (*.mdb;*.adp;*.mda;*.mde;*.ade) in the Files of type list.
  5. In the Look in box, select the drive and the folder that store the old Access database that you want to import.
  6. Click the file, and then click Import.
  7. Click one or more objects to import.

    Note Do not select all objects at the same time. You must select only one object or several objects at a time. This makes it easier to identify any corrupted objects. You must import the database objects in an organized order. For example, you may import tables, import forms and then import reports.

    If an error occurs in a group of objects, you must try to import smaller blocks of objects or try to import one object at a time (depending on how many you have) from that group until you find the object that causes the error.
  8. Click OK to import the selected objects.
  9. Repeat step 2 through step 6 until you import all the other objects to the new database.

    Note If an object generates an error when that object is imported, the object is probably permanently damaged. If this problem occurs, you can import the object from a backup database, or you can re-create the object.
  10. Compile all imported modules in the new database. To do this, follow these steps:
    1. In the Database window, click Modules.
    2. Select a module, and then click Design.
    3. On the Debug menu, click Compile <database name>.
  11. Exit Access 2003.
Note If your original database has references to libraries or references to projects (or both), make a note of the references. You must add the same references to the new database.

To view Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) references, follow these steps:
  1. Start Access 2003.
  2. Open the database that you want.
  3. On the Tools menu, point to Macro, and then click Visual Basic Editor.
  4. In the Visual Basic Editor, click References on the Tools menu.

    In the References dialog box, notice the libraries that are selected.
If a damaged database, a fragmented database, or a corrupted database was the cause of the unpredictable behavior or the cause of an application-related fatal error, the problems do not occur when you open and when you use the newly created database. If you notice the same problems in the new database, try the additional troubleshooting steps that are described in this article to find the cause of the problem.

For additional information about repairing Access databases, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
283849 How to Troubleshoot and Repair a Damaged Access 2002 or later Database

Damaged installation of Access 2003

You may also experience problems with your database if Access 2003 is not installed correctly on your computer. Incorrect installation may result in incorrect registry settings, missing dynamic link libraries (.dll files), or corrupted dynamic link libraries.

You can open your Access 2003 database on another computer that has Access 2003 installed. If your database opens and your database works correctly, you must either repair or reinstall Access 2003 on your computer.

To repair the Access 2003 installation, follow these steps:
  1. Start Access 2003.
  2. On the Help menu, click Detect and Repair.
  3. If you are prompted, insert the Microsoft Office Access 2003 CD in the CD drive. Follow the instructions until the repair is completed.

    If you are not prompted, you installed Access 2003 from the network.
  4. Exit Access 2003.
  5. Start Access 2003.

    To see if the problem no longer occurs, do the tasks that caused the fatal error.
If the problem is not resolved, remove Access 2003 and reinstall Access 2003. To do this, follow these steps.

Note If you have Visual Basic with Microsoft Visual SourceSafe installed, you do not have to remove the Visual Basic program. You only have to remove the Visual SourceSafe component.
  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  2. In Control Panel, double-click Add/Remove Programs.
  3. In Add/Remove Programs, select Office 2003, and then click Remove.

    Follow the instructions to remove all the Access 2003 programs.
  4. Reinstall Access 2003.
  5. Start Access 2003.

    To see if the problem no longer occurs, do the tasks that caused the fatal error.
Note If Access still behaves unpredictably or if you still receive a fatal system error either immediately or after continued use, try the additional troubleshooting steps that are described in this article.

Understand system-related problems

This section discusses system-related causes for fatal system errors in Windows 2000.

Memory conflict

A common cause of fatal system errors is the occurrence of a memory conflict that involves a device driver, a system component, or other loaded files. To troubleshoot a memory conflict, you must restart your computer in Safe Mode.

Safe Mode bypasses startup files, including the registry, the Config.sys file, the Autoexec.bat file, and the [Boot] section and the [386Enh] section of the System.ini file. Therefore, Safe Mode provides you access to the system configuration files. When you start your computer in Safe Mode, only required system files and required device drivers (such as the mouse, the keyboard, and the standard VGA) are loaded. This makes Safe Mode useful for isolating memory conflicts and for solving memory conflicts.

To start Windows 2000 in Safe Mode, follow these steps:
  1. Use either of the following procedures based on how your Windows 2000-based computer is set up:
    1. On the Please Select the Operating System to start menu, press F8.

      If your Windows 2000-based computer is set up for a multiple boot, this is the procedure that you must follow.
    2. When the Starting Windows progress bar appears at the bottom of the screen, press F8.

      If your Windows 2000-based computer is not set up for a multiple boot, this is the procedure that you must follow.

      Note Respond quickly when you see the Starting Windows progress bar. You may only have several seconds to press F8.
  2. Press ENTER.

    By default, Safe Mode is selected. You see Safe Mode appear in the four corners of your screen.
After Windows 2000 is loaded in Safe Mode, open the Access 2003 database. Try to reproduce the fatal error. If you cannot reproduce the fatal error in Safe Mode, the cause of the fatal error is probably system-related. The cause of the fatal error is not a problem with your installation of Access 2003.

For more information about running Windows 2000 in Safe Mode, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
202485 Description of Safe Boot Mode in Windows 2000
Note Windows 2000 does not provide step-by-step confirmation. If you are troubleshooting fatal system errors with Access in Windows 2000 and the previous article does not resolve the issue, you may want to contact Microsoft Product Support Services. For additional information about Product Support Services, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
http://support.microsoft.com/select/?target=hub

Temporary folder issues

When your computer does not have sufficient disk space for temporary files, you may notice unpredictable behavior in Access 2003. You must remove the old temporary files on your system periodically. After you remove the old temporary files, make sure that there is at least 8 megabytes (MB) to 10 MB of free space on your disk. Make sure that the free space is available to your temporary (Temp) folder.

You must determine the location of your Temp folder. You must verify the validity of your TMP environment variables and your TEMP environment variables. To do this, follow these steps:
  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  2. In Control Panel, double-click System.
  3. On the Advanced tab, click Environment Variables.

    Check whether the User Variables for <username> list contains valid settings for the TMP environment variable and for the TEMP environment variable.

    The following example shows valid settings:
    TEMP = C:\TEMP
    TMP = C:\TEMP
    If the TMP environment variable and the TEMP environment variable are not defined, you must create valid environment variables. To do this, follow these steps:
    1. In the Environment Variables dialog box, click New under the User variables for <User Name> section.
    2. In the New User Variable dialog box, type TEMP in the Variable Name box.
    3. In the Variable Value box, type C:\Temp (or any other valid path and valid folder name).
    4. Click OK to add these values to the User Variables for <username> list.
    5. Repeat step a through step c to create the TMP environment variable.
  4. Click OK.
  5. Click OK.
  6. Exit Control Panel.
  7. Start Microsoft Windows Explorer.
  8. Locate the folder that is specified in the TMP environment variable and in the TEMP environment variable.

    Note A TEMP environment variable setting that is not valid may have serious effects on Access 2003. Therefore, if you notice that the folder that is specified in the environment variable setting does not exist, you must either open Windows Explorer and then create a new temp folder in the specified location, or you must repeat step 1 through step 3 to update the environment variables to a valid location.
  9. Verify that the drive that contains the TEMP folder has sufficient free disk space.

    Note Make sure that the free disk space that is available on the drive where the TEMP folder is located is at least two times the size of the largest database that you may potentially open on your computer.

    For example, if your largest Access database file is 7 MB, make sure that the drive where the TEMP folder resides has at least 14 MB of free disk space.
  10. Verify that the TEMP folder is empty.

    If files exist in the TEMP folder, you can delete the .tmp files that are currently not in use. The .tmp files typically have a modified date that is earlier than the current session of Windows.
Note Microsoft recommends that you exit all Windows programs before you delete the .tmp files.

Disk Cleanup utility

In Windows 2000, you can delete many unused files or temporary files by using the Disk Cleanup utility. The Disk Cleanup utility searches your disk and then shows you temporary files, Internet cache files, and unnecessary program files that you can safely delete. You can control the Disk Cleanup utility so that you delete only the files that you want to delete.

To start the Disk Cleanup utility, click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Disk Cleanup.

Incompatible video driver or corrupted video driver

You may also notice page faults or unpredictable screen behavior in Access 2003 because of video-driver conflict or because of incorrect graphics hardware settings on your computer.

To troubleshoot a video-driver conflict, change the video adapter for your system to Standard VGA. To do this, follow these steps:
  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  2. In Control Panel, double-click Display.
  3. On the Settings tab, click Advanced.
  4. On the Troubleshooting tab, move the Hardware Acceleration slider to the None setting (all the way to the left), and then click OK.
  5. Click OK.
  6. Quit Control Panel.

Printer driver problem or printer settings problem

When you try to print in the Access 2003 environment, you may receive a fatal system error or you may notice printing problems. If these problems occur, use the Generic/Text Only printer driver. To do this, follow these steps:
  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  2. In Control Panel, double-click Printers.
  3. In Printers, double-click Add Printer.

    Follow the instructions in the Add Printer Wizard to install the Generic/Text Only printer driver. Try to print from Access 2003 by using the Generic/Text Only printer driver.
Note If the printing problems exist for Generic/Text Only printer driver in addition to another printer driver, the problem is likely not printer-driver specific. However, if the printing problems are corrected by using a different printer driver, to reinstall the problem printer driver, follow these steps:
  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  2. In Control Panel, double-click Printers.
  3. Right-click the printer that you want to remove, and then click Delete.
  4. Click Yes if you are prompted to remove all the files that are associated with the printer.
  5. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  6. In Control Panel, double-click Printers.
  7. In Printers, double-click Add Printer.

    Follow the instructions in the Add Printer Wizard to install the original printer driver.
Note If you reinstall the printer driver and the reinstallation does not solve the printing problems, you can use a different printer driver or the Generic/Text Only printer driver again. You must also contact the printer-driver manufacturer to report the problem and to find out if an updated printer driver is available.

Incorrect virtual memory settings

You may notice unexpected behavior in Access 2003 when the virtual memory setting is too low on your computer. The Windows 2000 operating system uses a dynamic virtual memory manager to handle paging file duties. You must use the default virtual memory settings whenever possible.

However, if you suspect that the unexpected behavior in Access 2003 is caused by low virtual memory, you can manually change the virtual memory settings. If the maximum setting for virtual memory is already set, you may have to select a different disk or to remove files from the current disk to increase the disk space that is reserved for extra memory. To increase the disk space that is reserved for virtual memory on your computer, follow these steps:
  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  2. In Control Panel, double-click System.
  3. On the Advanced tab, click Performance Options.
  4. In the Performance Options dialog box, click Change.
  5. In the Virtual Memory dialog box, select a disk, and then adjust the Initial Size setting and the Maximum Size setting.
  6. Click Set, and then click OK.

Disk fragmentation or disk errors

It is a good practice to occationally check for disk errors and disk fragmentation. To find and to correct these issues, run one of the following tools:

The Disk Error-Checking tool

The Disk Error-Checking tool looks for file system errors and for bad sectors on your disk. To run the Disk Error-Checking tool, follow these steps:
  1. Start Windows Explorer.
  2. In the Folders pane, select the local disk that you want to check.
  3. On the File menu, click Properties.
  4. On the Tools tab, click Check Now under the Error-Checking section.
  5. In the Check Disk dialog box, click to select the Scan for and attempt recovery of bad sectors check box under the Check disk options section, and then click Start.
The Disk Defragmenter tool

The Disk Defragmenter tool analyzes your disk to determine the level of fragmentation. The Disk Defragmenter tool can also defragment your disk. To use the Disk Defragmenter tool, follow these steps:
  1. Start Windows Explorer.
  2. In the Folders pane, select the local disk that you want to analyze or to defragment.
  3. On the File menu, click Properties.
  4. On the Tools tab, click Defragment Now under the Defragmentation section.
  5. Select the drive that contains your Access 2003 folders, and then click either Analyze or Defragment.

REFERENCES

For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
824271 Troubleshooting corruption in an Office Access 2003 database
For more information about examining error messages in Windows 2000, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
256004 How to troubleshoot "STOP 0x0000003F" and "STOP 0x000000D8" error messages in Windows Server 2003, Windows XP, and Windows 2000
228753 Troubleshooting "Stop 0x00000077" or "KERNEL_STACK_INPAGE_ERROR"
137539 General causes of STOP 0x0000007F errors

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Article ID: 825444 - Last Review: September 17, 2011 - Revision: 6.0
APPLIES TO
  • Microsoft Office Access 2003
Keywords: 
kbhowtomaster kbrepair kbtshoot kbsyssettings KB825444

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