Frequently asked questions about the Local Install Source feature in Office 2003

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Article ID: 830168 - View products that this article applies to.
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SUMMARY

This article contains the answers to some of the more frequently asked questions about the Local Install Source feature.

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Q1: At the end of the Microsoft Office 2003 setup, you see the Delete installation files check box on the Setup Completed page. Additionally, you see a message that states that it is recommended that you keep the installation files to help with Office maintenance and updates. Why would you want to follow this recommendation and keep the installation files?

A1: The Local Install Source feature is a new feature in Office 2003 setup. While this feature does take up more space on your local hard disk (up to 290 megabytes (MB) depending on the Microsoft Office product that you install), by leaving the files on your hard disk, you do not have to provide the Office CD-ROM later if you have to add an Office component, to perform a repair of the Office installation, or to install an Office update to your installation from Microsoft Office Online (http://office.microsoft.com). If you click to select the Delete installation files check box, you may have to provide your Office CD-ROM just as you did with previous versions of Microsoft Office.

Q2: What if you are already low on disk space, and you try to use the Local Install Source feature? Will you run out of disk space on your hard disk and have to move files or remove programs?

A2: The Local Install Source feature has built-in logic to detect low disk space. When none of your disk drives have more than 1.5 gigabyte (GB) of free disk space, the Local Install Source feature is automatically disabled.

When one or more of your disk drives has more than 1.5 GB of free space, the disk drive with the most available space is used for the Local Install Source feature. When one or more of your disk drives has more than 1.5 GB of free space, and when one of the drives that has more than 1.5 GB of free space uses the NTFS file system, the largest NTFS drive on your computer is used for the Local Install Source feature, even if it is not the largest drive on your computer.

When the Local Install Source feature is used, the files that are copied to your disk drive are copied to a new hidden folder at the root of the drive, and the folder is named \MSOCACHE. Only local drives that are non-removable are eligible to host the files copied by the Local Install Source feature.

Q3: What if you install multiple Office 2003 products? Is it possible to end up with a \MSOCACHE folder on more than one disk drive or drive partition?

A3: While each subsequently installed Office product will perform the same check for available disk space, Office 2003 setup will always select the existing \MSOCACHE folder to store the files that are required for the Local Install Source feature. When setup detects that there is not a disk drive with more than 1.5 GB of free disk space, the Local Install Source feature will be disabled for the Office 2003 product that you are trying to install. Setup disables the Local Install Source feature when there is not a disk drive that has more than 1.5 GB of free disk space to help prevent issues that may occur when the computer has low disk space.

Q4: When you want to save disk space, can you delete the files that are copied to your hard disk when you are using the Local Install Source feature?

A4: No. When you use the Local Install Source feature to delete the files that are copied to your hard disk drive, and then you perform any type of setup activity, you are prompted for your Office 2003 CD-ROM and any required source files that are copied to your local hard disk again.

The recommended method for removing the Local Install Source feature from your hard disk drive is to use the Local Installation Source Tool to remove the files from the local hard disk drive. This tool is available from the Office Resource Kit located at the following Microsoft Web site:
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/ork2003/HA011402361033.aspx
If you use the Local Installation Source Tool to remove the locally cached files, the registry entries that refer to the files are also removed so that the removal of the files does not cause future problems.

Q5: In the past, you were able to create an administrative installation image on the network and use the image to deploy Office to users on your network. When you use this method for deployment, can you use the Local Install Source feature in Office 2003?

A5: No. The Local Install Source feature uses files that are compressed into cabinet files. When you install Office by using the Setup /a command line, the files are extracted from the cabinet files. However, you can deploy from a CD image that has been copied to the network. The deployment tools that are provided in the Office 2003 Resource Kit have been modified to provide the same level of customization when you deploy Office 2003 by using this method.

For more information about these enhanced tools, see the Microsoft Office 2003 Resource Kit. To view the Microsoft Office 2003 Resource Kit, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/assistance/HA011402031033.aspx

Q6: In the past, you updated the administrative installation point with an administrative update to deploy service packs and other updates to your users. Can you use this method if you have deployed Office 2003 from a CD image on the network server?

A6: No. The original installation source on the server must remain unchanged. You must deploy service packs and other updates by applying the client version of the service pack or update directly to users’ computers. This is actually a real advantage for the network bandwidth of your organization because it will only be necessary to push the client service pack or update across the network. Typically, the recache and reinstall that occurs using the old method requires more network bandwidth than copying the installation package.

Q7: How do you control the location of the \MSOCACHE folder?

A7: To specify the location of the \MSOCACHE folder, use the LOCALCACHEDRIVE setup property. You can enable the LOCALCACHEDRIVE property from a command line or from a Setup settings file (the Setup.ini file ). The LOCALCACHEDRIVE property is documented in the Setup.htm file that is located on the Microsoft Office 2003 CD.

Note You cannot control the location of the \MSOCACHE folder in the Setup user interface. However, you can use the Local Installation Source Tool to change the hard disk drive that is being used to host the cached files. For more information about the Local Installation Source Tool, visit the Office Resource Kit that is located at the following Microsoft Web site:
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/ork2003/HA011402361033.aspx
Q8: If you have deleted the \MSOCACHE folder and you want to put it back, how do you do that?

A8: The best way to repair the Local Install Source is with the Local Installation Source Tool that is available in the Office Resource Kit that is located at the following Web site:
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/ork2003/HA011402361033.aspx
Use the Enable feature of this tool to complete the repair.

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Article ID: 830168 - Last Review: January 5, 2007 - Revision: 6.5
APPLIES TO
  • Microsoft Office Excel 2003
  • Microsoft Office FrontPage 2003
  • Microsoft Office Outlook 2003
  • Microsoft Office PowerPoint 2003
  • Microsoft Office Publisher 2003
  • Microsoft Office Word 2003
  • Microsoft Office Standard Edition 2003
  • Microsoft Office Student and Teachers Edition 2003
  • Microsoft Office Small Business Edition 2003
  • Microsoft Office Basic Edition 2003
  • Microsoft Office Access 2003
  • Microsoft Office Professional Edition 2003
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