Full-file version update may request Office source files

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Summary

When you install a full-file version of a Microsoft Office service pack, hotfix, or update, you may be prompted to provide the source files from where you first installed your Office programs. When this problem occurs, you can either provide the source files, or you may be able to update the modified date of the Office files that is causing the Microsoft Windows Installer to prompt you for the source files.

Symptoms

When you install a full-file version service pack, update, or hotfix to a Microsoft Office 2000 program, to a Microsoft Office XP program, or to a Microsoft Office 2003 program, you may be prompted to provide the original source media CD-ROM or the path of the administrative installation point (AIP) where you installed from. This behavior may occur so that the Office files that are not included in the update can be replaced on the client computer.

During a typical update installation, if a file is determined to have changed, the Windows Installer program may present a dialog box to you that contains the following message:
The feature you are trying to use is on a CD-ROM or other removable disk that is not available.
This request for source files indicates that a valid source is not currently available to the computer that is being updated.

Note For Office 2003, if a Local Install Source (LIS) is available, you do not receive a request to provide the source installation files during the update process because an LIS contains a compressed version of all the required files that Office 2003 requires.

For more information about Local Install Source, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
825933 Local Install Source (Msocache)

Cause

There are several likely causes for original Office files that are installed on a client computer to be changed in some way. During the updating process, the Windows Installer tries to verify that existing Office files have not changed. The Windows Installer program uses the following criteria to verify existing files:
  • The file version.
  • The file modified date and size.
  • The Cyclical Redundancy Check (CRC).
  • The file hash for unversioned files.
  • The file language.
If any one of the file criteria does not match what the Windows Installer program expects to find based on the information that is stored in the current Office Windows Installer database, a request for the Office source files may occur.

Note See the “More Information” section for one known cause when multiple versions of Office are installed on the same computer.

Possible reasons that the original Office source files may not be available include the following:
  • The original Office CD-ROM is not readily available.
  • The Office CD-ROM store keeping unit (SKU) does not match the installed product (such as Standard edition verses Professional edition).
  • The MSI package file name may be changed (such as Pro.msi may have been changed to Data1.msi).
  • The network file share (AIP) location may have changed.

Workaround

To work around this problem, use one of the following methods.

Method 1: Provide the Office source files

When you install an update to an Office program, you must provide the Office source files (CD-ROM or administrative installation point) from where you originally installed Microsoft Office to make sure that all Office files are complete.

Note For Microsoft Office 2000, the update that is described in the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base will help reduce the need to provide source files during an Office update:
835220 Description of the Office 2000 Update: February 10, 2004

Method 2: Manually change the modified dates of certain Office files

Sometimes you may be able to manually change the modified date of the file that the Windows Installer program has identified as changed. After you update the modified date of the file, the Windows Installer program will consider the file as 'user data'. A file that is considered 'user data' will not cause the Windows Installer program to request the Office source files.

A partial list of the shared files that may be considered 'user data' during typical use of an Office program include the following files:
  • Access9.mdb
  • Ctryinfo.txt
  • Excel9.xls
  • Outlook.hol
  • Pwrpnt9.pot
  • Pwrpnt10.pot
  • XL8Galry.xls
  • Winword8.doc
  • Readme.txt
To determine the Office file that the Windows Installer has determined must be changed, you must review the verbose log of the update installation.

There are two ways to turn on verbose logging before you start the update process for your Office programs.
  • Use Regedit. To use Regedit, follow these steps:
    1. Click Start, and then click Run.
    2. In the Open box, type regedit, and then click OK.
    3. In Registry Editor, locate, and then click the following key:
      HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\Installer
    4. With Installer selected, point to New on the Edit menu, and then click String Value.
    5. Type Logging, and then press ENTER.
    6. With Logging selected, click Modify on the Edit menu.
    7. In the Value data box, type voicewarmup, and then click OK.
    8. With Installer selected, point to New on the Edit menu, and then click DWORD Value.
    9. Type Debug, and then press ENTER.
    10. With Debug selected, click Modify on the Edit menu.
    11. In the Value data box, type 7, click Hexadecimal, and then click OK.
    12. On the File menu, click Exit to quit Registry Editor.
  • Use the Group Policy editor (Local Machine). To use the Group Policy editor, follow these steps:
    1. Click Start, and then click Run.
    2. In the Open box, type gpedit.msc, and then click OK.
    3. In the Group Policy editor, under Local Computer Policy, expand Computer Configuration.
    4. Expand Administrative Templates.
    5. Expand Windows Components.
    6. Select Windows Installer.
    7. In Windows Installer, select Logging.
    8. On the Action menu, click Properties.
    9. On the Settings tab of the Logging Properties dialog box, click Enabled.
    10. In the Logging box, type voicewarmup, and then click OK.
    11. On the File menu, click Exit to close the Group Policy editor dialog box.
After you turn on verbose logging and you install an Office update, a log file may be created that identifies the Office files that have changed.

To locate and to change the modified date of the files that the Windows Installer program has determined to have changed, follow these steps:
  1. Find the Office update verbose log file that is located in the user's Temp folder. To find the user's Temp folder, follow these steps:
    1. Click Start, and then click Run.
    2. In the Open box, type %temp%, and then click OK.
    The path of the user's Temp folder should be similar to the following:
    C:\Documents and Settings\username\Local Settings\Temp
    The Office update verbose logs will have file names that are similar to Msi#####.log, where the # (number sign) represents any alpha/numeric character. For example, a verbose log file could have the following file name:
    Msi7b3d5.log
    Note If the OHotfix.exe bootstrapping application utility is used for updates, the log files are stored in the following folder:
    C:\Documents and Settings\username\Local Settings\Temp\Ohotfix
    The update log files are created in two set pairs with a naming convention of OHotfix(00001).log and OHotfix(00001)_Msi.log.

    For more information about the OHotfix.exe utility, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
    Installing Client Update Files with OHotFix
  2. Check the timestamp of the log file to make sure that you have found the correct log file that was created for the latest update attempt because there may be many log files in the folder. To check the timestamp of the log file, right-click the log file, and then click Properties.
  3. Double-click the log file to open the file in your default text editor (such as Notepad).
  4. On the Edit menu, click Find.
  5. In the Find what box, type Resolving source, and then click Find Next.
  6. The line in the log file immediately above the words "Resolving source" will show the Office file that the Windows Installer program has determined was changed.

    Note The following example shows that the file Readme.txt has changed and will cause the Windows Installer program to prompt you for the Office source files:
    MSI (s) (B0:2C): File: C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft 
    Shared\Snapshot Viewer\README.TXT;  Overwrite;  No patch;  
    Existing file is unversioned and unmodified - hash doesn't 
    match source file
    MSI (s) (B0:2C): Resolving source.
  7. To change the modified date of the files listed in the log file, follow these steps:
    1. Click Start, and then click Search.
    2. Click All files and folders.
    3. In the All or part of the file name box, type the file name of the file that you found in the log file.
    4. In the Look in box, click your local hard disk drive.
    5. Click Search.
    6. Double-click the found file.
    7. After the file has opened, close the file without making any changes to the file.
    8. You may have to repeat steps 7a to 7g several times.
After each files modified date is changed, the Windows Installer program will not prompt you for the source Office files because each file will be considered 'user data' by the Windows Installer program.

More information

Microsoft has also determined that when you have multiple versions of Office installed on a computer, some shared files such as Excel9.xls or Xl8galry.xls may be overwritten by older files, depending on the version of the Office program that was installed last.

For example, if Office 2000 and Office XP are both installed, when you perform a repair of Excel 2000, the earlier Excel9.xls file may be copied to the C:\Windir\Shellnew folder. When you try to install an update for an Office XP program, this earlier unversioned Office 2000 file may show to have a hash that does not match the correct file hash for the Excel9.xls file from the Office XP source files.

References

For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
297168 How to programmatically update the source list for an installed Windows Installer package
828451 Service packs, updates, and security patches may require the Office XP CD-ROM
828450 Why service packs, updates, and security patches may require the Office 2000 CD-ROM
330043 The "Microsoft Office XP Update Deployment" white paper is available at the Download Center
830168 Frequently asked questions about the Local Install Source feature in Office 2003
For more information about file versioning, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa368599.aspx

Properties

Article ID: 840169 - Last Review: August 9, 2012 - Revision: 4.0
Applies to
  • Microsoft Office Access 2003
  • Microsoft Access 2002 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Access 2000 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Excel 2002 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Excel 2000 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft FrontPage 2002 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft FrontPage 2000 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Office Outlook 2003
  • Microsoft Outlook 2002 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Outlook 2000 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Office PowerPoint 2003
  • Microsoft PowerPoint 2002 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft PowerPoint 2000 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Office Publisher 2003
  • Microsoft Publisher 2002 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Publisher 2000 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Word 2002
  • Microsoft Word 2000
  • Microsoft Office Professional Edition 2003
  • Microsoft Office Basic Edition 2003
  • Microsoft Office Small Business Edition 2003
  • Microsoft Office 2000 Premium Edition
  • Microsoft Office 2000 Professional Edition
  • Microsoft Office 2000 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Office 2000 Small Business Edition
  • Microsoft Office 2000 Developer Edition
Keywords: 
kbprb KB840169

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