Troubleshooting DBCC error 2570 in SQL Server 2005 and later versions

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INTRODUCTION

This article describes SQL Server error 2570, what causes the error, and how to resolve the problem.

MORE INFORMATION

DATA_PURITY Checks

In SQL Server 2005, a new option, DATA_PURITY, has been added to the DBCC CHECKDB and DBCC CHECKTABLE commands. When you execute a DBCC CHECKDB or DBCC CHECKTABLE command with this option enabled, the command will perform "data purity" validations on every column value in all rows of the table or tables in the database. These new checks are performed to ensure that the values stored in the columns are valid (that is, that the values are not out-of-range for the domain associated with the data type of that column). The nature of the validation performed depends on the data type of the column. The following non-exhaustive list gives a few examples:
Collapse this tableExpand this table
Column data typeType of data validation performed
Unicode characterThe data length should be a multiple of 2.
DatetimeThe days field should be between Jan 1 1753 and Dec 31 9999. The time field must be earlier than '11:59:59:999PM' .
Real and FloatCheck for existence of invalid floating point values like SNAN, QNAN, NINF, ND, PD, PINF.
Not all data types are checked for the validity of the column data. Only those where it is possible to have a stored value that is out of range are checked. For example, the tinyint data type has a valid range of 0 through 255 and is stored in a single byte (which can only store values from 0 to 255), so checking the value is not necessary.

The data purity validation checks are not enabled automatically for all databases. The checks are enabled depending on several factors:
  • For databases created in SQL Server 2005 and later versions, these checks are enabled by default and cannot be disabled, so the use of the DATA_PURITY option when executing a DBCC CHECKDB or DBCC CHECKTABLE command is irrelevant.
  • For databases that were created in earlier versions of SQL Server, such as SQL Server 2000, SQL Server 7.0, and versions upgraded to SQL Server 2005, these checks are not enabled by default. In order for these checks to be performed, you must specify the DATA_PURITY option in the DBCC CHECKDB or DBCC CHECKTABLE command. This can result in two things:
    • The DBCC command finishes and reports that the database is clean, including all data purity checks. This fact is recorded in the database header. All subsequent DBCC CHECKDB or DBCC CHECKTABLE command executions will notice this information and will automatically perform the data purity checks, as would happen for databases created on SQL Server 2005. In other words, once a database is known to be "clean," the data purity checks are always performed.
    • The DBCC command finishes but reports problems about data inconsistency. If this is the case, you will have to clean the database to remove the inconsistencies and then attempt to execute the DBCC command again. You will have to specify the DATA_PURITY option for the DBCC command until the database is reported to be clean.
  • If the PHYSICAL_ONLY option is specified when the DBCC CHECKDB or DBCC CHECKTABLE command is executed, the data purity checks are not performed.

SYMPTOMS

Invalid or out-of-range data may have been stored in the SQL Server database in earlier versions for the following reasons:
  • Invalid data was present in the source while using bulk insert methods, such as the bcp utility.
  • Invalid data was passed through RPC event calls made to SQL Server.
  • Other potential causes of physical data corruption left the column value in an invalid state.
If you have invalid data in a column of a table, you might encounter problems depending on the type of operation that is performed against the invalid data. However, it is also possible that no problem will appear, and the invalid data will not be discovered until you execute a DBCC CHECKDB or DBCC CHECKTABLE command on SQL Server 2005 and later versions.

Some of the symptoms you may notice due to the presence of invalid data include (but are not limited to):
  • Access violations or other types of exceptions while executing queries against the affected column.
  • Incorrect results returned by queries executed against the affected column.
  • Errors or problems when statistics are being built against the affected columns.
  • Error messages like the following:
    Msg 9100, Level 23, State 2, Line 1 Possible index corruption detected. Run DBCC CHECKDB.

DATA_PURITY Problem Report

When you execute a DBCC CHECKDB or DBCC CHECKTABLE command with the DATA_PURITY option enabled (or the data purity checks are run automatically), and invalid data exists in the tables checked by the DBCC commands, the DBCC output includes additional messages that indicate the problems with the data. Some sample error messages that indicate data purity problems are shown below:
DBCC results for "account_history".
Msg 2570, Level 16, State 2, Line 1
Page (1:1073), slot 33 in object ID 1977058079, index ID 0, partition ID 129568478265344, alloc unit ID 129568478265344 (type "In-row data"). Column "account_name_japan" value is out of range for data type "nvarchar". Update column to a legal value.
Msg 2570, Level 16, State 2, Line 1
Page (1:1156), slot 120 in object ID 1977058079, index ID 0, partition ID 129568478265344, alloc unit ID 129568478265344 (type "In-row data"). Column "account_name_japan" value is out of range for data type "nvarchar". Update column to a legal value.
There are 153137 rows in 1080 pages for object "account_history".
CHECKDB found 0 allocation errors and 338 consistency errors in table "account_history" (object ID 1977058079).
CHECKDB found 0 allocation errors and 338 consistency errors in database 'BadUnicodeData'.
DBCC execution completed. If DBCC printed error messages, contact your system administrator.
DBCC results for 'table1'.
Msg 2570, Level 16, State 3, Line 1
Page (1:154), slot 0 in object ID 2073058421, index ID 0, partition ID 72057594038321152, alloc unit ID 72057594042318848 (type "In-row data"). Column "col2" value is out of range for data type "real". Update column to a legal value.
There are 4 rows in 2 pages for object "table1".
CHECKDB found 0 allocation errors and 1 consistency errors in table 'table1' (object ID 2073058421).
CHECKDB found 0 allocation errors and 1 consistency errors in database 'realdata'. DBCC execution completed. If DBCC printed error messages, contact your system administrator.
DBCC results for 'table2'.
Msg 2570, Level 16, State 3, Line 1
Page (1:155), slot 0 in object ID 2105058535, index ID 0, partition ID 72057594038452224, alloc unit ID 72057594042449920 (type "In-row data"). Column "col2" value is out of range for data type "decimal". Update column to a legal value.
There are 4 rows in 1 pages for object "table2".
CHECKDB found 0 allocation errors and 1 consistency errors in table 'table2' (object ID 2105058535).
CHECKDB found 0 allocation errors and 1 consistency errors in database 'realdata'. DBCC execution completed. If DBCC printed error messages, contact your system administrator.
DBCC results for 'table3'.
Msg 2570, Level 16, State 3, Line 1
Page (1:157), slot 0 in object ID 2121058592, index ID 0, partition ID 72057594038517760, alloc unit ID 72057594042515456 (type "In-row data"). Column "col2" value is out of range for data type "datetime". Update column to a legal value.
There are 3 rows in 1 pages for object "table3".
CHECKDB found 0 allocation errors and 1 consistency errors in table 'table3' (object ID 2121058592).
CHECKDB found 0 allocation errors and 1 consistency errors in database 'realdata'. DBCC execution completed. If DBCC printed error messages, contact your system administrator.
For every row that contains an invalid column value, a 2570 error is generated.

Fixing the Data Purity Problem

The 2570 errors cannot be repaired using any of the DBCC repair options. This is because it is impossible for DBCC to determine what value should used to replace the invalid column value. Thus, the column value must be manually updated.

To perform a manual update, you have to find the row that has the problem. There are two ways to accomplish this.
  • Execute a query against the table that contains the invalid values to find the rows that contain the invalid values.
  • Use the information from the 2570 error to identify the rows that have an invalid value.
We will discuss both of these methods in detail below, using examples to find the rows that have invalid data.

Once you find the correct row, a decision needs to be made on the new value that will be used to replace the existing invalid data. This decision has to be made very carefully based on the range of values that work for the application as well as what makes logical sense for that particular row of data. The choices you have are:
  • If you know what value it should be, set it to that specific value.
  • Set it to an acceptable default value.
  • Set the column value to NULL.
  • Set the column value to the maximum or minimum value for that data type of the column.
  • If you feel that the specific row is not of any use without a valid value for the column, you can delete that row altogether.

Finding Rows with Invalid Values Using T-SQL Queries

The type of query that you need to execute to find rows that have invalid values depends on the data type of the column that reported a problem. If you look at the 2570 error message, you will notice two important pieces of information that will help you with this. In the following example, the column "account_name_japan" value is out of range for data type "nvarchar." We can easily identify the column that has the problem as well as the data type of the column involved. Thus, once you know the data type and the column involved, you can formulate the query to find the rows that contain invalid values for that column, selecting the columns needed to identify that row (as the predicates in a WHERE clause) for any further update or delete.

Unicode data type:
SELECT col1 ,DATALENGTH(account_name_japan) as Length ,account_name_japan 
FROM account_history
WHERE DATALENGTH(account_name_japan) % 2 != 0

Float data type:
-- Change col1 to your actual primary key column(s), col2 to the column from the 2570 error, table1 to the table from the CHECKDB output

SELECT col1, col2 FROM table1
WHERE col2<>0.0 AND (col2 < 2.23E-308 OR col2 > 1.79E+308) AND (col2 < -1.79E+308 OR col2 > -2.23E-308)

Real data type:
-- Change col1 to your actual primary key column(s), col2 to the column from the 2570 error, table1 to the table from -- the CHECKDB output

SELECT col1, col2 FROM testReal 
WHERE col2<>0.0 AND (col2 < CONVERT(real,1.18E-38) OR col2 > CONVERT(real,3.40E+38)) AND (col2 < CONVERT(real,-3.40E+38) OR col2 > CONVERT(real,-1.18E-38)) 
ORDER BY col1; -- checks for real out of range
Decimal and Numeric data type:
SELECT col1 FROM table2
WHERE col2 > 9999999999.99999 
OR col1 < -9999999999.99999
Keep in mind that you will need to adjust the values based on the precision and scale with which you have defined the decimal or numeric column. In the above example, the column was defined as col2 decimal(15,5).

Date Time data type:
You will need to execute two different queries to identify the rows that contain invalid values for date time column.
SELECT col1 FROM table3
WHERE col2 < '1/1/1753 12:00:00 AM' OR col2 > '12/31/9999 11:59:59 PM'

SELECT col1 FROM table3 WHERE
((DATEPART(ms,col2)+ (1000*DATEPART(s,col2)) + (1000*60*DATEPART(mi,col2)) + (1000*60*60*DATEPART(hh,col2)))/(1000*0.00333)) 
> 25919999

Finding rows with invalid value using the physical location:

You can use this method if you are unable to find the rows of interest using the T-SQL method discussed above. In the 2570 error message, the physical location of the row that contains the invalid value is printed. For example, look at the following message:
Page (1:157), slot 0 in object ID 2121058592, index ID 0, partition ID 72057594038517760, alloc unit ID 72057594042515456 (type "In-row data"). Column "col2" value is out of range for data type "datetime". Update column to a legal value.
In this message, you will notice the information: Page (1:157), slot 0. This is the information you need to identify the row. The FileId is 1, the PageInFile is 157, and the SlotId is 0. Once you have this information, you will need to execute the command, as follows:
DBCC TRACEON ( 3604 )
DBCC PAGE ( realdata , 1 , 157 , 3 )
This command will print the entire contents of a page. Parameters to the DBCC PAGE command are:
  • database name
  • FileId
  • PageInFile
  • print option
Once you execute this command, you will notice output that contains information similar to the following format:
Slot 0 Offset 0x60 Length 19 Record Type = PRIMARY_RECORD Record
		  Attributes = NULL_BITMAP Memory Dump @0x44D1C060 00000000: 10001000 01000000
		  ffffffff ffffffff †................ 00000010:
		  0200fc†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††... Slot 0 Column 0 Offset 0x4 Length 4 col1 = 1Slot 0 Column 1 Offset 0x8 Length 8 col2 = Dec 31 1899 19:04PM Slot 1 Offset 0x73 Length 19 Record Type = PRIMARY_RECORD Record
		  Attributes = NULL_BITMAP Memory Dump @0x44D1C073 00000000: 10001000 02000000
		  0ba96301 f8970000 †..........c..... 00000010:
		  0200fc†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††... Slot 1 Column 0 Offset 0x4 Length 4
		  col1 = 2 Slot 1 Column 1 Offset 0x8 Length 8 col2 = Jul 8 2006 9:34PM Slot 2
		  Offset 0x86 Length 19 Record Type = PRIMARY_RECORD Record Attributes =
		  NULL_BITMAP Memory Dump @0x44D1C086 00000000: 10001000 03000000 0ba96301
		  f8970000 †..........c..... 00000010: 0200fc†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††...
		  Slot 2 Column 0 Offset 0x4 Length 4 col1 = 3 Slot 2 Column 1 Offset 0x8 Length
		  8 col2 = Jul 8 2006 9:34PM 
In this output you can clearly see the column values for the row of interest to you. In this case, you need the row stored in slot 0 of the page. From the error message, you know that col2 is the one with the problem. So you can take the value of col1 for Slot 0 and use it as the predicate in the WHERE clause of your update statement or delete statement.

WARNING We recommend that you use the first method (that is, use T-SQL queries to find the required information). Use the DBCC PAGE command only as a last resort. Take utmost care while you use this command in a production environment. It is advisable to restore the production database on a test server, then get all the required information using DBCC PAGE, and then do the updates on the production server. As always, make sure to keep a backup ready in case something goes wrong and you need to revert to an earlier copy of the database.

REFERENCES

For more information about the DBCC CHECKDB statement, see the "DBCC CHECKDB (Transact-SQL)" topic on the following Microsoft Developer Network (MSDN) Web site:
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms176064.aspx
For more information about known issues in SQL Server 2000, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
900335 FIX: The SQL Server 2000 automatic database recovery operation may not succeed if an index contains a FLOAT data type or a REAL data type, and this data type contains a NaN value
For more information about RPC events, see the "Calling a Stored Procedure (OLE DB)" topic on the following MSDN Web site:
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa198358(SQL.80).aspx
For more information about the different data types, see the "Calling a Stored Procedure (OLE DB)" topic on the following MSDN Web site:
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms187752.aspx
For more information about floating point value conventions, visit the following Intel Web site:
http://www.intel.com/design/pentiumii/manuals/243191.htm
Microsoft provides third-party contact information to help you find technical support. This contact information may change without notice. Microsoft does not guarantee the accuracy of this third-party contact information.

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Article ID: 923247 - Last Review: March 22, 2012 - Revision: 3.0
APPLIES TO
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Developer Edition
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Enterprise Edition
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Express Edition
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Express Edition with Advanced Services
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Workgroup Edition
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Enterprise Edition for Itanium-based Systems
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Enterprise X64 Edition
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Standard Edition for Itanium-based Systems
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Standard X64 Edition
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Standard
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 Developer
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Enterprise
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Express
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Express with Advanced Services
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Workgroup
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Standard Edition for Small Business
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