Error message when you try to connect to a file server by using an alternative NetBIOS name in Windows Server 2003: "No network provider accepted the given network path"

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Article ID: 940684 - View products that this article applies to.
Important This article contains information about how to modify the registry. Make sure that you back up the registry before you modify it. Make sure that you know how to restore the registry if a problem occurs. For more information about how to back up, restore, and modify the registry, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
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SYMPTOMS

On a computer that is running Windows Server 2003, you receive the following error message when you try to connect to a file server by using an alternative NetBIOS name that is registered in Windows Internet Name Service (WINS):
No network provider accepted the given network path
This problem does not occur on a computer that is running Windows XP with Service Pack 2.

Note You can connect to the file server by using the fully qualified domain name (FQDN) of the file server or by using the IP address of the file server.

CAUSE

This problem occurs because the computer does not send a NetBIOS adapter status request after the computer receives a negative session response from the file server. You expect the computer to send this request to obtain the list of NetBIOS names that are registered for the adapter.

WORKAROUND

To work around this problem, use one of the following to connect to the file server:
  • The FQDN of the file server
  • The IP address of the file server
  • The DNS alias of the file server

STATUS

Microsoft has confirmed that this is a problem in the Microsoft products that are listed in the "Applies to" section.

MORE INFORMATION

The following network trace is captured on a computer that is running Windows Server 2003:
<Client>	<File server>	NbtSS	NbtSS: SESSION REQUEST, Length = 68
<File server>	<Client>	NbtSS	NbtSS: NEGATIVE SESSION RESPONSE, Length = 1
<Client>	<File server>	TCP	TCP: Flags=....A..., SrcPort=1139, DstPort=NETBIOS Session Service(139), Len=0
<Client>	<File server>	TCP	TCP: Flags=F...A..., SrcPort=1139, DstPort=NETBIOS Session Service(139), Len=0
<File server>	<Client>	TCP	TCP: Flags=....A..., SrcPort=NETBIOS Session Service(139), DstPort=1139, Len=0
This network trace indicates that the computer does not send more requests after it receives a negative session response.

The following are the details of the negative session response:
+ Ethernet: Etype = Internet IP (IPv4)
+ Ipv4: Next Protocol = TCP, Packet ID = 718, Total IP Length = 45
+ Tcp: Flags=F..PA..., SrcPort=NETBIOS Session Service(139), DstPort=1139, Len=5, Seq=<number> - <number>, Ack=<number>, Win=<number>
- Nbtss: NEGATIVE SESSION RESPONSE, Length = 1
  - NormalNbtSS: 
     PacketType: NEGATIVE SESSION RESPONSE, 131(0x83)
   + Flags: Add 0 to Length
     Length: 1(0x1)
     ErrorCode: Error: Called name not present. 130(0x82)
The following network trace is captured on a computer that is running Windows XP with Service Pack 2:
<Client>	<File server>	NbtSS	NbtSS: SESSION REQUEST, Length = 68
<File server>	<Client>	NbtSS	NbtSS: NEGATIVE SESSION RESPONSE, Length = 1
<Client>	<File server>	TCP	TCP: Flags=....A..., SrcPort=3737, DstPort=NETBIOS Session Service(139), Len=0
<Client>	<File server>	NbtNs	NbtNs: Query Request for *                <0x00> Workstation Service
<File server>	<Client>	NbtNs	NbtNs: Query Response, Success for *                <0x00> Workstation Service
...
<Client>	<File server>	NbtSS	NbtSS: SESSION REQUEST, Length = 68
<File server>	<Client>	NbtSS	NbtSS: POSITIVE SESSION RESPONSE, Length = 0
<Client>	<File server>	SMB	SMB: C; Negotiate, Dialect = PC NETWORK PROGRAM 1.0, LANMAN1.0, Windows for Workgroups 3.1a, LM1.2X002, LANMAN2.1, NT LM 0.12
<File server>	<Client>	SMB	SMB: R; Negotiate, Dialect is  (#5)
This network trace indicates that the computer sends a request after the computer receives a negative session response. The request is to obtain the list of NetBIOS names that are registered for the adapter. This request resembles the following:
<Time> 0003FF82FBCF 0003FF86FBCF NBT NS: Query req. for *<00...(15)> C02WXN02WKS TESTSRV IP 
<Time> 0003FF86FBCF 0003FF82FBCF NBT NS: Query (Node Status) resp. for *<00...(15)>, Success TESTSRV C02WXN02WKS IP 
    NBT: Question Count = 0 (0x0)
    NBT: Answer Count = 1 (0x1)
    NBT: Name Service Count = 0 (0x0)
    NBT: Additional Record Count = 0 (0x0)
    NBT: Resource Record Name =*<00...(15)>
    NBT: Resource Record Type = Node Status Request
    NBT: Resource Record Class = Internet Class
    NBT: Time To Live(Seconds) = 0 (0x0)
    NBT: RDATA Length = 119 (0x77)
    NBT: Number of Names = 4 (0x4)
    NBT: ASCII Name = C02E3N02SRV    00
    NBT: Resource Record Flags = 1024 (0x400)
        NBT: ......0......... = Non-Permanent
        NBT: .....1.......... = Active Name
        NBT: ....0........... = Name is not in Conflict
        NBT: ...0............ = Not Deregistering
        NBT: .00............. = B Node
        NBT: 0............... = Unique NetBIOS Name
    NBT: ASCII Name = CORP2          00
    NBT: Resource Record Flags = 33792 (0x8400)
        NBT: ......0......... = Non-Permanent
        NBT: .....1.......... = Active Name
        NBT: ....0........... = Name is not in Conflict
        NBT: ...0............ = Not Deregistering
        NBT: .00............. = B Node
        NBT: 1............... = Group NetBIOS Name
    NBT: ASCII Name = CORP2          <1E>
    NBT: Resource Record Flags = 33792 (0x8400)
        NBT: ......0......... = Non-Permanent
        NBT: .....1.......... = Active Name
        NBT: ....0........... = Name is not in Conflict
        NBT: ...0............ = Not Deregistering
        NBT: .00............. = B Node
        NBT: 1............... = Group NetBIOS Name
    NBT: ASCII Name = C02E3N02SRV     
    NBT: Resource Record Flags = 1024 (0x400)
        NBT: ......0......... = Non-Permanent
        NBT: .....1.......... = Active Name
        NBT: ....0........... = Name is not in Conflict
        NBT: ...0............ = Not Deregistering
        NBT: .00............. = B Node
        NBT: 0............... = Unique NetBIOS Name

Steps to reproduce this problem

Warning Serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly by using Registry Editor or by using another method. These problems might require that you reinstall the operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that these problems can be solved. Modify the registry at your own risk.
  1. Disable direct Server Message Block (SMB) hosting on the file server. This step makes sure that you connect to the file server only over the 139 port. To do this, set the SMBDeviceEnabled registry entry to 0 (zero). The SMBDeviceEnabled entry is in the following registry subkey:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\NetBT\Parameters
  2. Create a static unique record in WINS that has an alternative name that points to the IP address of the file server. Make sure that the DNS system has no entry that has the same name.
  3. Try to connect to file server by using the following path:
    \\AlternateName

Properties

Article ID: 940684 - Last Review: October 11, 2007 - Revision: 1.3
APPLIES TO
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition (32-bit x86)
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition (32-bit x86)
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Datacenter Edition (32-bit x86)
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Web Edition
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Standard x64 Edition
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Enterprise x64 Edition
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Datacenter x64 Edition
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition for Itanium-based Systems
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Datacenter Edition for Itanium-Based Systems
Keywords: 
kbtshoot kberrmsg kbexpertiseinter kbprb KB940684

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