Surface touchscreen: Problems with touch

Applies to: Surface Devices

If the touchscreen doesn’t respond correctly to touch, try these solutions.

Before you begin

Here’s a list of things to try that may help Surface respond correctly to touch. If you’ve tried all these things and they don’t work, you’ll need to send your Surface in for service.

Before trying the solutions below, here are some things to know:

  • Try each solution in order. The solutions most likely to solve your problem are near the top.
  • If the glass on your Surface touchscreen is cracked or broken, touch may not work. To learn more, see What to do if your Surface screen is damaged.
  • To learn more about touchscreen gestures and tips for using touch on your Surface, see Use touch with Windows and Get to know Microsoft Edge.
  • If you have trouble touching just the item you want, consider using a Surface Pen or another capacitive stylus.
  • If you have a Surface 3 or Surface Pro 3 and want to use pressure sensitivity with graphics apps like Corel Draw and early versions of Photoshop, install the WinTab driver for Surface Pro 3 from Surface software, firmware, and drivers.

Solution 1: Clean the screen

Use a soft, lint-free cloth dampened with water or eyeglass cleaner but don’t apply liquids directly to the screen. To learn more, see Clean and care for your Surface.

Solution 2: Restart your Surface

Sometimes, all you need to get your touchscreen working again is a restart:

  1. Press the Windows logo key .
    (If you're using a mouse, select Start .)
  2. Press the Tab key to select Power, and then press Enter.
    (With a mouse, select Power.)
  3. Use the arrow keys to highlight Restart, and then press Enter.
    (With a mouse, select Restart.)

Solution 3: Install the latest updates

Your touchscreen might not be working because you don’t have the latest updates. For more info on installing Windows updates, see Install Surface and Windows updates. If your Surface does not restart automatically after you install updates, restart it manually. To restart your Surface, go to Start , and select Power > Restart.

Solution 4: Force a shut down

See Force a shut down and restart your Surface to find out how.

Solution 5: Disable and enable the touchscreen driver

If a two-button shutdown doesn't work, try this:

  1. Select the search box in the taskbar, enter device manager, and then select Device Manager in the search results.
  2. Select the arrow to the left of Human Interface Devices.
  3. Right-click HID-compliant touch screen, and then select Disable.
  4. Right-click HID-compliant touch screen, and then select Enable.

Solution 6: Reinstall the touchscreen driver

If disabling and re-enabling your touchscreen driver doesn't work, try this:

  1. Select the search box in the taskbar, enter device manager, and then select Device Manager in the results.
  2. Select the arrow to the left of Human Interface Devices.
  3. Right-click HID-compliant touch screen, and then select Uninstall.
  4. Restart your Surface.
    Your Surface will automatically download and install the touchscreen driver when you connect to the Internet.

Solution 7: Reset touchscreen calibration

If solutions 1-6 didn’t work, recalibrate the touchscreen:

  1. Press the Windows logo key .
    (If you're using a mouse, select Start .)
  2. Enter calibrate, use the arrow keys to highlight Calibrate the screen for pen or touch input, and then press Enter.
    (With a mouse, select Calibrate the screen for pen or touch input.)

  3. Press the Tab key until the Reset button is selected, and then press Enter.
    (With a mouse, select Reset.)
    If the Reset button is dimmed, your Surface touch calibration is still at factory settings. Skip to Solution 8.
  4. Press the Tab key until the Yes button is selected, press Enter, and then follow the on-screen instructions.
    (With a mouse, select Yes, and then follow the on-screen instructions.)
  5. After your Surface removes the recalibration data, test the touchscreen to see if it responds appropriately.

Solution 8: Check for electromagnetic interference

Sometimes, other electronic devices nearby can interfere with the touchscreen or make the cursor on your Surface move around unexpectedly. The culprit could just be a nearby power strip or a lamp on your desk, or it could be something like large equipment or banks of computers.

  1. To find out if this is the problem, take your Surface to another room, another building, or outdoors. If the touchscreen problem occurs only in certain locations, you’re probably getting electronic interference.
  2. Turn off all the other devices in the area, and then turn them on one by one to figure out which device is causing the problem.
  3. If you don’t find the source of the problem, check nearby rooms for more powerful equipment that may be producing electronic interference.

Solution 9: Restore or reset your Surface

If you're still having problems with the touchscreen, try restoring or resetting your Surface, in that order. To find out how, see Restore or reset Surface.

Solution 10: Send your Surface in for service

If the touchscreen still isn’t working after these steps, your Surface needs service. Go to Get my Surface fixed.