For quick access to related information in another file or on a web page, you can insert a hyperlink in a worksheet cell. You can also insert links in specific chart elements.

Note: Most of the screen shots in this article were taken in Excel 2016. If you have a different version your view might be slightly different, but unless otherwise noted, the functionality is the same.

  1. On a worksheet, click the cell where you want to create a link.

    You can also select an object, such as a picture or an element in a chart, that you want to use to represent the link.

    • On the Insert tab, in the Links group, click Link Hyperlink button.

    You can also right-click the cell or graphic and then click Link on the shortcut menu, or you can press Ctrl+K.

  2. Under Link to, click Create New Document.

  3. In the Name of new document box, type a name for the new file.

    Tip: To specify a location other than the one shown under Full path, you can type the new location preceding the name in the Name of new document box, or you can click Change to select the location that you want and then click OK.

  4. Under When to edit, click Edit the new document later or Edit the new document now to specify when you want to open the new file for editing.

  5. In the Text to display box, type the text that you want to use to represent the link.

  6. To display helpful information when you rest the pointer on the link, click ScreenTip, type the text that you want in the ScreenTip text box, and then click OK.

  1. On a worksheet, click the cell where you want to create a link.

    You can also select an object, such as a picture or an element in a chart, that you want to use to represent the link.

    • On the Insert tab, in the Links group, click Link Hyperlink button.

    You can also right-click the cell or object and then click Link on the shortcut menu, or you can press Ctrl+K.

  2. Under Link to, click Existing File or Web Page.

  3. Do one of the following:

    • To select a file, click Current Folder, and then click the file that you want to link to.

      You can change the current folder by selecting a different folder in the Look in list.

    • To select a web page, click Browsed Pages and then click the web page that you want to link to.

    • To select a file that you recently used, click Recent Files, and then click the file that you want to link to.

    • To enter the name and location of a known file or web page that you want to link to, type that information in the Address box.

    • To locate a web page, click Browse the Web Browse the Web button, open the web page that you want to link to, and then switch back to Excel without closing your browser.

  4. If you want to create a link to a specific location in the file or on the web page, click Bookmark, and then double-click the bookmark that you want.

    Note: The file or web page that you are linking to must have a bookmark.

  5. In the Text to display box, type the text that you want to use to represent the link.

  6. To display helpful information when you rest the pointer on the link, click ScreenTip, type the text that you want in the ScreenTip text box, and then click OK.

To link to a location in the current workbook or another workbook, you can either define a name for the destination cells or use a cell reference.

  1. To use a name, you must name the destination cells in the destination workbook.

    How to name a cell or a range of cells

    1. Select the cell, range of cells, or nonadjacent selections that you want to name.

    2. Click the Name box at the left end of the formula bar Button image.

      Example of Name box

      Button image Name box

    3. In the Name box, type the name for the cells, and then press Enter.

      Note: Names can't contain spaces and must begin with a letter.

  2. On a worksheet of the source workbook, click the cell where you want to create a link.

    You can also select an object, such as a picture or an element in a chart, that you want to use to represent the link.

    • On the Insert tab, in the Links group, click Link Hyperlink button.

    You can also right-click the cell or object and then click Link on the shortcut menu, or you can press Ctrl+K.

  3. Under Link to, do one of the following:

    • To link to a location in your current workbook, click Place in This Document.

    • To link to a location in another workbook, click Existing File or Web Page, locate and select the workbook that you want to link to, and then click Bookmark.

  4. Do one of the following:

    • In the Or select a place in this document box, under Cell Reference, click the worksheet that you want to link to, type the cell reference in the Type in the cell reference box, and then click OK.

    • In the list under Defined Names, click the name that represents the cells that you want to link to, and then click OK.

  5. In the Text to display box, type the text that you want to use to represent the link.

  6. To display helpful information when you rest the pointer on the link, click ScreenTip, type the text that you want in the ScreenTip text box, and then click OK.

When you click a link to an email address, your email program automatically starts and creates an email message with the correct address in the To box, provided that you have an email program installed.

  1. On a worksheet, click the cell where you want to create a link.

    You can also select an object, such as a picture or an element in a chart, that you want to use to represent the link.

    • On the Insert tab, in the Links group, click Link Hyperlink button.

    You can also right-click the cell or object and then click Link on the shortcut menu, or you can press Ctrl+K.

  2. Under Link to, click E-mail Address.

  3. In the E-mail address box, type the email address that you want.

  4. In the Subject box, type the subject of the email message.

    Note: Some web browsers and email programs may not recognize the subject line.

  5. In the Text to display box, type the text that you want to use to represent the link.

  6. To display helpful information when you rest the pointer on the link, click ScreenTip, type the text that you want in the ScreenTip text box, and then click OK.

    You can also create a link to an email address in a cell by typing the address directly in the cell. For example, a link is created automatically when you type an email address, such as someone@example.com.

By default, unspecified paths to hyperlink destination files are relative to the location of the active workbook. Use this procedure when you want to set a different default path. Each time that you create a link to a file in that location, you only have to specify the file name, not the path, in the Insert Hyperlink dialog box.

Follow one of the steps depending on the Excel version you are using:

  • In Excel 2016, Excel 2013, and Excel 2010:

    1. Click the File tab.

    2. Click Info.

    3. Click Properties, and then select Advanced Properties.

      Advanced Properties
    4. In the Summary tab, in the Hyperlink base text box, type the path that you want to use.

      Note: You can override the link base address by using the full, or absolute, address for the link in the Insert Hyperlink dialog box.

  • In Excel 2007:

    1. Click the Microsoft Office Button Office button image, click Prepare, and then click Properties.

    2. In the Document Information Panel, click Properties, and then click Advanced Properties.

      Advanced Properties
    3. Click the Summary tab.

    4. In the Hyperlink base box, type the path that you want to use.

    Note: You can override the link base address by using the full, or absolute, address for the link in the Insert Hyperlink dialog box.

A link opens another page or file when you click it. The destination is frequently another web page, but it can also be a picture, or an email address, or a program. The link itself can be text or a picture.

When a site user clicks the link, the destination is shown in a Web browser, opened, or run, depending on the type of destination. For example, a link to a page shows the page in the web browser, and a link to an AVI file opens the file in a media player.

How links are used

You can use links to do the following:

  • Navigate to a file or web page on a network, intranet, or Internet

  • Navigate to a file or web page that you plan to create in the future

  • Send an email message

  • Start a file transfer, such as downloading or an FTP process

When you point to text or a picture that contains a link, the pointer becomes a hand Pointer in the shape of a hand, indicating that the text or picture is something that you can click.

What a URL is and how it works

When you create a link, its destination is encoded as a Uniform Resource Locator (URL), such as:

http://example.microsoft.com/news.htm

file://ComputerName/SharedFolder/FileName.htm

A URL contains a protocol, such as HTTP, FTP, or FILE, a Web server or network location, and a path and file name. The following illustration defines the parts of the URL:

The four components of a URL

1. Protocol used (http, ftp, file)

2. Web server or network location

3. Path

4. File name

Absolute and relative links

An absolute URL contains a full address, including the protocol, the Web server, and the path and file name.

A relative URL has one or more missing parts. The missing information is taken from the page that contains the URL. For example, if the protocol and web server are missing, the web browser uses the protocol and domain, such as .com, .org, or .edu, of the current page.

It is common for pages on the web to use relative URLs that contain only a partial path and file name. If the files are moved to another server, any links will continue to work as long as the relative positions of the pages remain unchanged. For example, a link on Products.htm points to a page named apple.htm in a folder named Food; if both pages are moved to a folder named Food on a different server, the URL in the link will still be correct.

In an Excel workbook, unspecified paths to link destination files are by default relative to the location of the active workbook. You can set a different base address to use by default so that each time that you create a link to a file in that location, you only have to specify the file name, not the path, in the Insert Hyperlink dialog box.

  1. On a worksheet, select the cell where you want to create a link.

  2. On the Insert tab, select Hyperlink.

    You can also right-click the cell and then select Hyperlink... on the shortcut menu, or you can press Ctrl+K.

  3. Under Display Text:, type the text that you want to use to represent the link.

  4. Under URL:, type the complete Uniform Resource Locator (URL) of the webpage you want to link to.

  5. Select OK.

To link to a location in the current workbook, you can either define a name for the destination cells or use a cell reference.

  1. To use a name, you must name the destination cells in the workbook.

    How to define a name for a cell or a range of cells
     

    Note: In Excel for the Web, you can't create named ranges. You can only select an existing named range from the Named Ranges control. Alternately, you can open the file in the Excel desktop app, create a named range there, and then access this option from Excel for the web.

    1. Select the cell or range of cells that you want to name.

    2. On the Name Box box at the left end of the formula bar Button image, type the name for the cells, and then press Enter.

      Note: Names can't contain spaces and must begin with a letter.

  2. On the worksheet, select the cell where you want to create a link.

  3. On the Insert tab, select Hyperlink.

    You can also right-click the cell and then select Hyperlink... on the shortcut menu, or you can press Ctrl+K.

  4. Under Display Text:, type the text that you want to use to represent the link.

  5. Under Place in this document:, enter the defined name or cell reference.

  6. Select OK.

When you click a link to an email address, your email program automatically starts and creates an email message with the correct address in the To box, provided that you have an email program installed.

  1. On a worksheet, select the cell where you want to create a link.

  2. On the Insert tab, select Hyperlink.

    You can also right-click the cell and then select Hyperlink... on the shortcut menu, or you can press Ctrl+K.

  3. Under Display Text:, type the text that you want to use to represent the link.

  4. Under E-mail address:, type the email address that you want.

  5. Select OK.

You can also create a link to an email address in a cell by typing the address directly in the cell. For example, a link is created automatically when you type an email address, such as someone@example.com.

You can use the HYPERLINK function to create a link to a URL.

Note: The Link_location can be a text string enclosed in quotation marks or a reference to a cell that contains the link as a text string.

To select a hyperlink without activating the link to its destination, do any of the following:

  • Select a cell by clicking it when the pointer is an arrow.

  • Use the arrow keys to select the cell that contains the link.

You can change an existing link in your workbook by changing its destination, its appearance, or the text that is used to represent it.

  1. Select the cell that contains the link that you want to change.

    Tip: To select a hyperlink without activating the link to its destination, use the arrow keys to select the cell that contains the link.

  2. On the Insert tab, select Hyperlink.

    You can also right-click the cell or graphic and then select Edit Hyperlink... on the shortcut menu, or you can press Ctrl+K.

  3. In the Edit Hyperlink dialog box, make the changes that you want.

    Note: If the link was created by using the HYPERLINK worksheet function, you must edit the formula to change the destination. Select the cell that contains the link, and then select the formula bar to edit the formula.

  1. Right-click the hyperlink that you want to copy or move, and then select Copy or Cut on the shortcut menu.

  2. Right-click the cell that you want to copy or move the link to, and then select Paste on the shortcut menu.

To delete a link, do one of the following:

  • To delete a link, select the cell and press Delete.

  • To turn off a link (delete the link but keep the text that represents it), right-click the cell and then select Remove Hyperlink.

Need more help?

You can always ask an expert in the Excel Tech Community or get support in the Answers community.

See Also

Remove or turn off links

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