An Internet Explorer or Edge window opens when your computer connects to a corporate network or a public network

Gilt für: Windows Server 2019Windows Server 2016Windows Server 2012

Symptoms


You connect a computer that's running Windows 8 (or a later version) to a network in either of the following conditions:

  • You connect your computer to a public network that requires Hotspot Sign in information (for example a hotel, airport, and so forth).
  • You connect your computer to a corporate network that uses a proxy server to connect to the internet.

You notice the following behavior:

  • The default browser (for example, Internet Explorer or Edge) opens, and shows a web page such as a sign-in page for the network or the MSN portal page.
  • The network icon on the Task Bar shows an alert symbol (for example,
    Network status alert
    ). If you hover over the icon, you see a message such as "No connectivity" or "Limited Internet access."

After you sign in to the network, you can use the network in the usual manner. After you use the network for a few seconds, the network alert on the Task Bar disappears.

Cause


This behavior is by design.

More information


Windows uses the Network Location Awareness (NLA) service to detect the properties of a network and determine how to manage connections to that network. NLA uses a component that is named the Network Connectivity Status Indicator (NCSI) to determine whether the computer has successfully connected to the network, and whether the network has intranet or internet connectivity.

NCSI uses both active and passive probes. These probes are triggered by changes in any of the network interfaces. When you connect your computer to a network as described in the Symptoms section, NCSI begins a process that includes one or more of the following:

NCSI active probes and the network status alert

The active probe process consists of the following steps:

  • Windows 10 or later versions:
    1. NCSI sends a DNS request to resolve the address of the www.msftconnecttest.com FQDN.
    2. If NCSI receives a valid response from a DNS server, NCSI sends a plain HTTP GET request to http://www.msftconnecttest.com/connecttest.txt.
    3. If NCSI successfully downloads the text file, it makes sure that the file contains Microsoft Connect Test.
    4. NCSI sends another DNS request to resolve the address of the dns.msftncsi.com FQDN.
    • If any of these requests fails, the network alert appears in the Task Bar (as described in Symptoms). If you hover over the icon, you see a message such as "No connectivity" or "Limited Internet access" (depending on which requests failed).
    • If all of these requests succeed, the Task Bar shows the usual network icon. If you hover over the icon, you see a message such as "Internet access."
  • Windows 8.1 or earlier versions:
    1. NCSI sends a DNS request to resolve the address of the www.msftncsi.com FQDN.
    2. If NCSI receives a valid response from a DNS server, NCSI sends a plain HTTP GET request to http://www.msftncsi.com/ncsi.txt.
    3. If NCSI successfully downloads the text file, it makes sure that the file contains Microsoft NCSI.
    4. NCSI sends another DNS request to resolve the address of the dns.msftncsi.com FQDN.
    • If any of these requests fails, the network alert appears in the Task Bar (as described in Symptoms). If you hover over the icon, you see a message such as "No connectivity" or "Limited Internet access" (depending on which requests failed).
    • If all of these requests succeed, the Task Bar shows the usual network icon. If you hover over the icon, you see a message such as "Internet access."

NCSI and the NLA service combine these responses with other information to build a profile of the network connection, or identify its existing profile. The network connection profile provides the information that Windows needs to configure the appropriate Windows Firewall profile:

  • For Active Directory-authenticated networks: Firewall domain profile.
  • For networks that the user has marked as "private": Firewall private profile.
  • For networks that the user has marked as "public": Public firewall profile.

Authentication and the automatic sign-in page

If the network requires credentials, Windows opens the default browser (such as Internet Explorer or Edge). If the network has a sign-in page, that page appears in the browser.

This behavior was introduced to improve the Windows user experience. In earlier versions of Windows, when you connect to a network that requires you to authenticate, the browser window does not open automatically. You may see a message that states that you must take further action in order to connect fully to the network. To complete the connection, you must click the message to open a browser window (or manually open a browser window) and enter a user name and password.

Because the network does not allow internet access without credentials, the network alert appears in the Task Bar.

NCSI passive monitoring, the MSN Portal page, and the network status alert

In addition to the active probes that this article describes, NCSI monitors the network activity of other applications on the computer. This passive monitoring process continues even if the active probe process fails. NCSI adjusts its network status determination based on whether other applications can make successful TCP connections. If a network alert appears because of a failed active probe, it disappears when a passive probe succeeds.

In some cases, such as when you connect to a network that uses a proxy server to connect to the internet or when network restrictions prevent NCSI from completing its active probe process, Windows opens the MSN Portal page in the default browser. If you analyze a network trace on the computer, it shows an HTTP connection to http://www.msftconnecttest.com/redirect that is followed by a connection to the MSN Portal. Windows opens this page for the benefit of the passive probe process. If the page loads, NCSI concludes that the computer has internet access. As the different probes fail and then succeed, the network status alert appears and then disappears.

Workaround


You can disable the NCSI active or passive probes by using the registry or Group Policy Objects (GPOs).

To use the registry to disable NCSI active probes, configure one of the following registry keys.

  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\NlaSvc\Parameters\Internet\EnableActiveProbing
    • Key Type: DWORD
    • Value: Decimal 0 (False)
  • HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\NetworkConnectivityStatusIndicator\NoActiveProbe
    • Key Type: DWORD
    • Value: Decimal (True)

To use the registry to disable NCSI passive probes, create the following registry key.

  • HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\NetworkConnectivityStatusIndicator\DisablePassivePolling
    • Key Type: DWORD
    • Value: Decimal 1 (True)

To use Group Policy to disable NCSI active probes, configure the following GPO:

  • Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\System\Internet Communication Management\Internet Communication settings\Turn off Windows Network Connectivity Status Indicator active tests
    • Value: Enabled

To use Group Policy to disable NCSI passive probes, configure the following GPO:

  • Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\Network\Network Connectivity Status Indicator\Specify passive polling.
    • Value: Enabled