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OFF: "Built-in Constants in Visual Basic for Applications" (WC0993)

This article was previously published under Q112671
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The Application Note "Built-in Constants in Microsoft Visual Basic forApplications," (WC0993) provides a complete list of the constants that areincluded in Microsoft Office 97 programs and Microsoft Excel for Windows,versions 5.0 and 7.0, for use in Visual Basic for Applications.

This Application Note contains the Microsoft Excel 97, Microsoft Access97, Microsoft Office Binder 97, Microsoft Office 97, Microsoft Outlook 97,Microsoft PowerPoint 97, Visual Basic for Applications, Microsoft Word 97,and Microsoft Excel for Windows, versions 5.0 and 7.0, constants files.You can use these files in Visual Basic 3.0 or later projects. These filesprovide the definitions of these constants so that you can use the name ofthe constants in your Visual Basic modules. This Application Note alsoincludes a Microsoft Excel 5.0 workbook file, Constants.xls, whichincludes lists of the constants that you can sort alphabetically ornumerically.

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THE TEXT OF WC0993

======================================================================        Microsoft(R) Technical Support Application Note (Text File)         WC0993: BUILT-IN CONSTANTS IN MICROSOFT VISUAL BASIC(R)                             FOR APPLICATIONS======================================================================                                                   Revision Date: 3/97The following information applies to Microsoft Office 97, Microsoft Excelfor Windows(R), versions 5.0 and 7.0.-----------------------------------------------------------------------| INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THIS DOCUMENT AND ANY SOFTWARE THAT MAY     || ACCOMPANY THIS DOCUMENT (collectively referred to as an Application || Note) IS PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER      || EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE IMPLIED      || WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND/OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR       || PURPOSE. The user assumes the entire risk as to the accuracy and    || the use of this Application Note. This Application Note may be      || copied and distributed subject to the following conditions: 1) All  || text must be copied without modification and all pages must be      || included; 2) If software is included, all files on the disk(s) must || be copied without modification (the MS-DOS(R) utility diskcopy is   || appropriate for this purpose); 3) All components of this            || Application Note must be distributed together; and 4) This          || Application Note may not be distributed for profit.                 ||                                                                     || Copyright (C) 1994-1997 Microsoft Corporation. All Rights Reserved. || Microsoft, MS-DOS, and Visual Basic are registered trademarks and   || Windows is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation.                    ||---------------------------------------------------------------------|OVERVIEW========This Application Note provides a complete list of the constants that areincluded in Microsoft Office 97 programs and Microsoft Excel for Windows,versions 5.0 and 7.0, for use in Visual Basic for Applications. Thefollowing files are included.   Filename            Function   ----------------------------------------------------------------------   Constant.xls        Microsoft Excel for Windows, version 5.0, workbook                       that contains a complete list of all the built-in                       constants discussed in this document   Ac97cons.bas        Constants file for Microsoft Access 97   Bd97cons.bas        Constants file for Microsoft Office Binder 97 for                       Windows   Of97cons.bas        Constants file for common Microsoft Office 97 for                       Windows features   Ol97cons.bas        Constants file for Microsoft Outlook 97   Pp97cons.bas        Constants file for Microsoft PowerPoint 97 for                       Windows   Vbacons.bas         Constants file for common Visual Basic for                       Applications features   Wd97cons.bas        Constants file for Microsoft Word 97 for Windows   Xl57cons.bas        Constants file for Microsoft Excel for Windows,                       versions 5.0 and 7.0   Xl97cons.bas        Constants file for Microsoft Excel 97 for WindowsYou can use the BAS files with Microsoft Visual Basic, versions 3.0 andlater, or with any other program that supports Visual Basic or VisualBasic for Applications. Each BAS file contains a complete set of constantsfor a specific program. If you include the BAS file in a Visual Basicproject, you can use constant names (instead of typing the values) inVisual Basic modules.Constant.xls is a Microsoft Excel 5.0 workbook that contains a complete,easy-to-use listing of all the constants in the BAS files.WHAT ARE BUILT-IN CONSTANTS?============================When you create a procedure using Visual Basic for Applications, you canuse constants to represent values that you use frequently. Using constantsmakes your code easier to read and maintain. For example, if you use thevalue 5.67 frequently, you can define a constant called MyValue as 5.67,and then use MyValue in your procedure everywhere you would use the value5.67.Programs that can use Visual Basic for Applications include built-inconstants that you can use in Visual Basic functions, methods, objects,and properties. The built-in constants for a specific program begin withthe same two-letter prefix. The prefixes for the Office programs arelisted in the following table.   Prefix         Program   --------------------------------------   xl             Microsoft Excel   wd             Microsoft Word   ac             Microsoft Access   pp             Microsoft PowerPoint   bind           Microsoft Office Binder   ol             Microsoft Outlook   mso            Microsoft Office   vb             Visual BasicBuilt-in constants make it easier for you to create procedures in Officeprograms with Visual Basic and Visual Basic for Applications. For example,to change the orientation of an active Microsoft Excel worksheet tolandscape or to check whether a cell is center-aligned, you could use thefollowing Visual Basic code:   ActiveWorksheet.PageSetup.Orientation = xlLandscape   If Range("A1").HorizontalAlignment = xlCenter Then      MsgBox "Cell A1 is centered!"   End IfThe built-in constants in this example (xlLandscape and xlCenter) areeasier to remember than the numeric values they represent. Also, when youuse built-in constants, it is easier to read the code and understand thefunction the code performs. For example, without built-in constants, youuse the following code to change the orientation of an active MicrosoftExcel worksheet to landscape or to check whether a cell is center-aligned:   ActiveWorksheet.PageSetup.Orientation = 2   If Range("A1").HorizontalAlignment = -4108 ThenNote that it is difficult to understand what these lines do without firstknowing what the values 2 and -4108 represent.Using Built-in Constants in Microsoft Office 97 Programs--------------------------------------------------------When you write a Visual Basic for Applications macro in a program, built-in constants that belong to that program are automatically available. Forexample, if you write a Visual Basic for Applications macro in MicrosoftExcel, all of the Microsoft Excel constants are automatically available tothe macro.However, when you use one program (for example, Microsoft Access) tocontrol another program (for example, Microsoft Excel), and you use theconstants for the program you want to control in the macro, you must addthe constants to the controlling program. To make the constants availableto a program, do either of the following: - Load the BAS file for the program that you want to control to the   project. - Create a reference to the program that you want to control.Loading a BAS File into a Visual Basic forApplications Project in a Microsoft Office 97 Program-----------------------------------------------------To load the BAS file, use the following steps:1. In the Visual Basic Editor (press ALT+F11), click Module on the Insert   menu to create a new module.2. On the Insert menu, click File. In the Insert File dialog box, open the   folder that contains the BAS file you want to add. In the Files of Type   list, click Basic Files (*.bas).3. Click the BAS file you want, and then click Open.It may take a few seconds for the Visual Basic Editor to load the BASfile. After you load the file, the module contains many Global Conststatements. Each statement declares a single constant.NOTE: Do not add both the Xl57cons.bas and the Xl97cons.bas files to yourproject. These files are similar but provide constants for differentversions of Microsoft Excel.Creating a Reference to the Program That You Want to Control------------------------------------------------------------To create a reference to the program, use the following steps:1. In the Visual Basic Editor (press ALT+F11), click References on the   Tools menu.2. In the Available References list, click to select the check box to the   left of the object library that contains the constants that you want to   use. For example, if you want to use constants that belong to Microsoft   Word 97, click to select the check box to the left of Microsoft Word   8.0 Object Library.   Note In this dialog box, "8.0" and "97" are synonymous. Therefore, the   Microsoft Excel 8.0 Object Library provides the constants for Microsoft   Excel 97.3. After you finish selecting the libraries you want to use, click OK.You can now use the constants that belong to the referenced programsin the Visual Basic for Applications macro.USING BUILT-IN CONSTANTS IN MICROSOFT VISUAL BASIC==================================================If you write a Microsoft Visual Basic program that uses Automation tocontrol an Office program, you may want to use the constants thatbelong to that program. Depending on the version of Microsoft VisualBasic you are using, use one of the following methods to make theconstants available: - Load the BAS file for the program that you want to control to the   project.   NOTE: This method works for any version of Microsoft Visual Basic. - Create a reference to the program that you want to control.Loading a BAS File into a Code Module-------------------------------------Visual Basic 5.0:To load the BAS file, use the following steps:1. In the development environment, click Add Module on the Project menu.   On the New tab, click Module, and then click Open.   This step adds an empty code module to the project.2. Verify that the module is the active window. On the Edit menu, click   Insert File.3. In the List Files of Type box, click Basic Files (*.bas).4. Click the BAS file and click Open.Visual Basic 4.0:To load the BAS file, use the following steps:1. In the development environment, click Module on the Insert menu.   This adds an empty code module to your project.2. Verify that the module is the active window. On the Insert menu, click   File.3. In the List Files of Type box, click Basic Files (*.bas).4. Select the BAS file and click Open.Visual Basic 3.0:To load the BAS file, use the following steps:1. In the development environment, click New Module on the File menu.   This step adds an empty code module to the project.2. Verify that the module is the active window. On the File menu click   Load Text.3. In the List Files of Type box, click Basic Files (*.bas).4. Click the BAS file, and click Replace. If you want to add the BAS file   to a module that contains other code or declarations, click Merge.Creating a Reference to the Program That You Want to Control------------------------------------------------------------Visual Basic 5.0:To create a reference to the program, use the following steps:1. On the View menu, click Project Explorer.2. On the Project menu, click References. If the References command   appears dimmed, the project is running. To make the command available,   end program execution.3. In the Available References list, select the check box to the left of   the object library that contains the constants you want to access. For   example, if you want to access constants that belong to Microsoft Word   97, select the check box to the left of Microsoft Word 8.0 Object   Library.   Note In this dialog box, "8.0" and "97" are synonymous. Therefore, the   Microsoft Excel 8.0 Object Library provides the constants for Microsoft   Excel 97.4. After you finish selecting the libraries you want to use, click OK.Visual Basic 4.0:To create a reference to the program, use the following steps:1. On the View menu, click Project.2. On the Tools menu, click References. If the References command appears   dimmed, the project is running. To make the command available, end   program execution.3. In the Available References list, click to select the check box to the   left of the object library that contains the constants you want to   access. For example, if you want to access constants that belong to   Microsoft Word 97, click to select the check box to the left of   Microsoft Word 8.0 Object Library.   Note In this dialog box, "8.0" and "97" are synonymous. Therefore, the   Microsoft Excel 8.0 Object Library provides the constants for Microsoft   Excel 97.4. After you finish selecting the libraries you want to use, click OK.WHERE ARE BUILT-IN CONSTANTS LISTED IN MICROSOFT OFFICE PROGRAMS?=================================================================The built-in constants that are available for a program are listed in Helpor in the Object Browser. If you want to determine which built-inconstants are available for a particular function, look them up in Help oruse the Object Browser.Looking Up a Built-in Constant in Help--------------------------------------Microsoft Office 97 Programs:1. Start the Visual Basic Editor (press ALT+F11).2. On the Standard toolbar, click Office Assistant.3. Type the name of the function you want to view in the box and click   Search.4. In the list of topics, click the button for the function you want to   view.Microsoft Excel 7.0:1. In a Visual Basic module, click Microsoft Excel Help Topics on the Help   menu.2. Click the Index tab.3. Type the name of the function you want to view in the box and click   Display.Any built-in constants that are available to the function appear inbold in the Help topic text for that function. For example, theConvertFormula method uses the following six built-in constants. Theseconstants are listed in bold, for example: xlA1, xlR1C1, xlAbsolute,xlAbsRowRelColumn, xlRelRowAbsColumn, and xlRelative.Microsoft Excel 5.01. On the Help menu, click Contents.2. In the Microsoft Excel Help Contents window, click Programming with   Visual Basic.3. In the Visual Basic Reference window, click Search and click the Index   tab.4. Type the name of the function you want to view in the box and click   Display.Any built-in constants that are available to the function appear inbold in the Help topic text for that function. For example, theConvertFormula method uses the following six built-in constants. Theseconstants are listed in bold, for example: xlA1, xlR1C1, xlAbsolute,xlAbsRowRelColumn, xlRelRowAbsColumn, and xlRelative.Looking Up Constants with the Object Browser--------------------------------------------Microsoft Office 97 Programs:1. Start the Visual Basic Editor (press ALT+F11).2. On the View menu, click Object Browser.3. In the Project/Library box, click the library that contains the   constants you want to view (for example, click Excel).   Note Click <All Libraries> to browse through a list of all libraries.4. In the Classes list, click Constants.   The constants are listed in the Members of 'Constants' box.Microsoft Excel 5.0 and 7.0:1. In a Visual Basic module, click Object Browser on the View menu.2. In the Libraries/Workbooks list box, click Excel.3. In the Objects/Modules list, click Constants.   A list of the built-in constants appears in the Methods/Properties   list.For a complete list of the built-in constants, see the Constant.xls filethat is included with this Application Note.USING THE LISTS IN CONSTANT.XLS===============================The Constant.xls workbook contains a complete list of the built-inconstants. These lists are designed so that you can easily sort them inalphabetical or numerical order.When you open the workbook in Microsoft Excel, the Contents worksheet isdisplayed. This worksheet contains basic information about the workbook,including instructions for moving between worksheets and information aboutlibrary files.		
xlconstants wdconstants acconstants ppconstants msoconstants bindconstants olconstants vbconstants
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Article ID: 112671 - Last Review: 01/18/2007 23:40:08 - Revision: 4.6

  • Microsoft Office 97 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Access 97 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Excel 5.0 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Excel 95 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Excel 97 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Outlook 97 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft PowerPoint 97 Standard Edition
  • Microsoft Word 97 Standard Edition
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