Change in Remote Access route behavior in Windows 2000, in Windows Server 2003, and in Windows XP

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Summary
The default behavior of the remote access client in clients that are running Windows 2000, Microsoft Windows XP, or Microsoft Windows Server 2003, is different from earlier versions of Windows. Earlier versions of Windows add a default subnet route to the remote access client when they connect to a remote access server. This route is "classful," meaning that it assumes a network mask based on the address received.

More information
This route table example is from a Microsoft Windows 98 Dial-Up Networking client:
Active Routes:  Network Address          Netmask  Gateway Address        Interface  Metric          0.0.0.0          0.0.0.0     123.15.0.130     123.15.0.130       1        123.0.0.0        255.0.0.0     123.15.0.130     123.15.0.130       1     123.15.0.130  255.255.255.255        127.0.0.1        127.0.0.1       1  123.255.255.255  255.255.255.255     123.15.0.130     123.15.0.130       1        127.0.0.0        255.0.0.0        127.0.0.1        127.0.0.1       1        224.0.0.0        224.0.0.0     123.15.0.130     123.15.0.130       1  255.255.255.255  255.255.255.255     123.15.0.130     123.15.0.130       1				

Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003 do not create the subnet route. The routes added to the client after connecting by using remote access are: a HOST route to the address of the remote access server, a HOST route to the address received, and a default gateway route.

The next two sample route tables are from a Windows 2000-based remote access client:
===========================================================================Interface List0x1 ........................... MS TCP Loopback interface0x7000002 ...00 53 45 00 00 00 ...... WAN (PPP/SLIP) Interface======================================================================================================================================================Active Routes:Network Destination        Netmask          Gateway       Interface  Metric          0.0.0.0          0.0.0.0     123.15.0.130    123.15.0.130	  1     123.15.0.129  255.255.255.255     123.15.0.130    123.15.0.130	  1     123.15.0.130  255.255.255.255        127.0.0.1       127.0.0.1	  1  123.255.255.255  255.255.255.255     123.15.0.130    123.15.0.130	  1        127.0.0.0        255.0.0.0        127.0.0.1       127.0.0.1	  1        224.0.0.0        224.0.0.0     123.15.0.130    123.15.0.130	  1Default Gateway:      123.15.0.130===========================================================================Persistent Routes:  None				
If you disable the Use default gateway on remote network option in the dial-up connection's properties, a network route is added as before.
===========================================================================Interface List0x1 ........................... MS TCP Loopback interface0x9000002 ...00 53 45 00 00 00 ...... WAN (PPP/SLIP) Interface======================================================================================================================================================Active Routes:Network Destination        Netmask          Gateway       Interface  Metric        123.0.0.0        255.0.0.0     123.15.0.130    123.15.0.130	  1     123.15.0.129  255.255.255.255     123.15.0.130    123.15.0.130	  1     123.15.0.130  255.255.255.255        127.0.0.1       127.0.0.1	  1  123.255.255.255  255.255.255.255     123.15.0.130    123.15.0.130	  1        127.0.0.0        255.0.0.0        127.0.0.1       127.0.0.1	  1        224.0.0.0        224.0.0.0     123.15.0.130    123.15.0.130	  1===========================================================================Persistent Routes:  None				
In earlier versions of Windows, you can add routes using the remote access server's remote access address as the next hop. Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003 do not support this function. To add static routes to a Windows 2000-based remote access connection, you must configure them to use the address received as the next hop.

In all of the examples in this article, the remote access server address pool begins at 123.15.0.129. The first address from the pool is used by the remote access server itself.
ras route static
Properties

Article ID: 254231 - Last Review: 01/11/2015 03:23:30 - Revision: 6.0

  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition (32-bit x86)
  • Microsoft Windows XP Professional
  • Microsoft Windows 2000 Server
  • Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server
  • Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional Edition
  • kbnosurvey kbarchive kbinfo KB254231
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