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How to Configure Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol Servers with Split Scopes

This article was previously published under Q280473
This article has been archived. It is offered "as is" and will no longer be updated.
This article describes how to configure Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) servers with split scopes.
You can implement split scopes, create identical scopes, and exclude opposite portions of the address range on each DHCP server. For example, assume that there are two DHCP servers: DHCPServerA and DHCPServerB. Both servers serve the subnet, where the host addresses is between and In this example, the scope is split in half.

On DHCPServerA, create a scope with a start address of and an end address of, and then create an exclusion from to

On DHCPServerB create the same scope:the start address and the end address Then, create an exclusion from to

A scope can also be divided between more than two servers in a similar way using the preceding guidelines.

If you create two Microsoft (MS) DHCP servers with the same scope without any exclusions, you can cause each DHCP server to send a NACK request from the opposite DHCP server. This configuration may result in clients that are unable to obtain leases, or clients that take very long periods of time to obtain leases.

You can confirm this behavior by examining Event Viewer for event 1011. Also, the DHCP Audit log lists any corresponding DHCPNACK entries.

NOTE: Incorrectly configured split scopes are only one possible cause of a DHCPNACK message.

Article ID: 280473 - Last Review: 12/05/2015 22:56:03 - Revision: 1.3

Microsoft Windows 2000 Server, Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server, Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0 Standard Edition

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