Frequently asked questions - SQL Server 2000 - Setup

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Summary

This article addresses frequently asked questions regarding the setup and installation of SQL Server 2000. Detailed information and explanation for various setup topics are available in SQL Server Books Online. SQL Server Books Online is installed automatically in a typical SQL Server setup, and is also an option that you can choose in a custom SQL Server setup. You can also download SQL Server Books Online from the following Microsoft Web site:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sqlserver/bb331756.aspx
For more information about upgrades, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
261334 Frequently asked questions - SQL Server 2000 - Upgrade
After you install SQL Server 2000, if you need to migrate existing databases from other SQL Servers, follow the instructions outlined in the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
314546 How to move databases between computers that are running SQL Server

More information

Important This section, method, or task contains steps that tell you how to modify the registry. However, serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly. Therefore, make sure that you follow these steps carefully. For added protection, back up the registry before you modify it. Then, you can restore the registry if a problem occurs. For more information about how to back up and restore the registry, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
322756 How to back up and restore the registry in Windows
  1. Q. What are the operating system requirements for SQL Server 2000?

    A. The following table shows the operating systems that must be installed to use the various editions and components of SQL Server 2000.

    Collapse this tableExpand this table
    SQL Server ComponentVersion of Microsoft Windows Supported
    Enterprise EditionMicrosoft Windows NT Server 4.0 with Service Pack 5 or later, Windows NT Server 4.0 Enterprise Edition with Service Pack 5 or later, Windows 2000 Server, Windows 2000 Advanced Server, or Windows 2000 Datacenter Server
    Standard EditionMicrosoft Windows NT Server 4.0 with Service Pack 5 or later, Windows NT Server 4.0 Enterprise Edition with Service Pack 5 or later, Windows 2000 Server, Windows 2000 Advanced Server, or Windows 2000 Datacenter Server
    Personal EditionWindows XP Home, Windows XP Professional, Microsoft Windows 98, Windows Me, Windows NT Workstation 4.0 with Service Pack 5 or later, Windows NT Server 4.0 with Service Pack 5 or later, Windows NT Server 4.0 Enterprise Edition with Service Pack 5 or later, Windows 2000 Professional, Windows 2000 Server, Windows 2000 Advanced Server, or Windows 2000 Datacenter Server
    Developer EditionWindows XP Home, Windows XP Professional, Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0 with Service Pack 5 or later, Windows NT Server 4.0 with Service Pack 5 or later, Windows NT Server 4.0 Enterprise Edition with Service Pack 5 or later, Windows 2000 Professional, Windows 2000 Server, Windows 2000 Advanced Server, or Windows 2000 Datacenter Server
    Enterprise Evaluation EditionWindows XP Home, Windows XP Professional, Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0 with Service Pack 5 or later, Windows NT Server 4.0 with Service Pack 5 or later, Windows NT Server 4.0 Enterprise Edition with Service Pack 5 or later, Windows 2000 Professional, Windows 2000 Server, Windows 2000 Advanced Server, or Windows 2000 Datacenter Server
    Desktop EngineWindows XP Home, Windows XP Professional, Microsoft Windows 98, Windows Me, Windows NT Workstation 4.0 with Service Pack 5 or later, Windows NT Server 4.0 with Service Pack 5 or later, Windows NT Server 4.0 Enterprise Edition with Service Pack 5 or later, Windows 2000 Professional, Windows 2000 Server, Windows 2000 Advanced Server, or Windows 2000 Datacenter Server


    System requirements are discussed in detail in the Books Online topic "Hardware and Software Requirements for Installing SQL Server 2000" and at the following Microsoft Web site:
    http://www.microsoft.com/sql/prodinfo/previousversions/system-requirements.mspx
  2. Q. What are the hardware requirements for installing SQL Server 2000?

    A: The following table shows hardware requirements for installing SQL Server 2000:

    Collapse this tableExpand this table
    HardwareMinimum requirements
    ComputerIntel or compatible Pentium 166 MHz or higher.
    Memory (RAM)Enterprise Edition: 64 MB minimum, 128 MB or more recommended
    Standard Edition: 64 MB minimum
    Personal Edition: 128 MB for Windows XP, 64 MB minimum on Windows 2000, 32 MB minimum on all other operating systems
    Developer Edition: 64 MB minimum
    Desktop Engine: 128 MB for Windows XP, 64 MB minimum on Windows 2000, 32 MB minimum on all other operating systems
    Evaluation Edition: 64 MB; 128 MB recommended.
    Hard-drive spaceSQL Server database components: 95 to 270 MB free hard-drive space for the server, 250 MB for a typical installation
    Analysis Services: 50 MB minimum, 130 MB typical
    English Query: 80 MB
    Desktop Engine only: 44 MB
    MonitorVGA or higher resolution
    800x600 or higher resolution required for the SQL Server graphical tools
    Pointing deviceMicrosoft Mouse or compatible mouse
    CD-ROM driveRequired
  3. Q. Do I need to be concerned about licenses when installing only the SQL Server 2000 Client Tools?

    A. You do not need to configure any licensing options when installing the SQL Server 2000 tools only. However, when using the tools to connect to SQL Server, you will be governed by the End-User License Agreement (EULA) for the appropriate Licensing model chosen for the SQL Server to which you are connecting.

    If you have a Processor License on the target SQL Server, you do not require a separate Client Access License to use the tools. If you have a Server License on the target SQL Server, you need a Client Access License to connect to the SQL Server. For a detailed discussion of this topic, see the following Microsoft Web site:
    http://www.microsoft.com/sql/howtobuy/default.mspx
  4. Q. Which versions of Microsoft Internet Explorer do I need to install in order for the SQL Server 2000 tools to work properly?

    A. Internet Explorer requirements are as follows:
    • If you are using SQL Server 2000 Enterprise Manager and Books Online, you need Internet Explorer 5.0 installed. A minimal installation of Internet Explorer is sufficient.
    • If you are using Client Connectivity components alone and are not connecting to a server that requires encryption, Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.01 with Service Pack 2 is sufficient.
  5. Q. Can I install SQL Server 2000 on a server running Microsoft Windows NT 4.0, Terminal Server Edition?

    A. No. SQL Server 2000 is not currently supported on Windows NT 4.0 Terminal Server. However, SQL Server 2000 is supported on Windows 2000 Terminal Server.
  6. Q. Are there any preferred steps that need to be taken care of before starting the installation of SQL Server 2000?

    A. Yes. For a successful installation, follow these steps:
    1. Log on to the computer using a Windows user account which is part of the Local Administrators user group.
    2. Close all applications and stop the services that use ODBC. Review the "Conflicting Services" section of the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
      192710 Basic guidelines for installing SQL Server 6.5 or 7.0
      Also, review the information in the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
      183692 SQL Server Setup program stops responding after you copy the files successfully
    3. Close Event Viewer and Registry Editor.
  7. Q. What are the different editions available in SQL Server 2000?

    A. SQL Server 2000 is available in seven different editions. They are Enterprise Edition, Standard Edition, Personal Edition, Developer Edition, Microsoft Windows CE edition, Enterprise Evaluation Edition, and Desktop Engine. The differences in features among these editions is clearly explained in "Choosing an Edition of SQL Server 2000" at the following Microsoft Web site:
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/sql/2000/reskit/part2/c0361.mspx?mfr=true
  8. Q. How do I obtain the Personal Edition of SQL Server 2000?

    A: SQL Server 2000 Personal Edition is included as a separate CD with SQL Server 2000 Standard Edition and Enterprise Edition. The Personal Edition cannot be purchased separately.
  9. Q. How do I convert an Enterprise Evaluation edition of SQL Server 2000 to a retail edition of SQL Server 2000?

    A. You can perform a simple upgrade of an Enterprise Evaluation Edition to one of the Retail editions of SQL Server 2000 by running the setup program. For additional information, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    281574 How to upgrade to SQL Server 2000 Retail Version after SQL Server 2000 Evaluation Edition expires
  10. Q. How many instances of SQL Server 2000 can be installed on a computer?

    A: The maximum number of instances supported in SQL Server 2000 is 16. The number of instances that can run on a single computer depends on available resources.
  11. Q. What are default instances and named instances?

    A: The default instance of the SQL Server 2000 database engine operates the same way as the database engines in earlier versions of SQL Server. The default instance is identified solely by the name of the computer on which the instance is running; it does not have a separate instance name.

    All instances of the database engine other than the default instance are identified by an instance name specified during installation of the instance. Applications must provide both the computer name and the instance name of any named instance to which they are attempting to connect.

    The computer name and instance name are specified in the format computer_name\instance_name. There can be multiple named instances running on a computer, but only the SQL Server 2000 database engine can operate as a named instance.
  12. Q. How do I find information about the install locations for the various instances running on a computer?

    A: You can find out the install paths from the registry key corresponding to each instance. The following registry key contains the required information:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Microsoft SQL Server\{InstanceName}\MSSQLServer\Setup\SQLPath
  13. Q. How do I determine how many instances of SQL Server are installed on a computer?

    A: The names of all SQL Server instances on a computer can be found from the InstalledInstances value which is located under the following registry key:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Microsoft SQL Server
  14. Q. What are the guidelines on choosing instance names?

    A: The following rules are applicable for instance names:
    • An instance name cannot be the terms Default or MSSQLServer.
    • Instance names must follow the rules for SQL Server identifiers and cannot be reserved keywords.
    • Instance names are limited to 16 characters.
    • The first character in the instance name must be a letter, an ampersand, an underscore (_), or a number sign (#). Acceptable letters are those defined by the Unicode Standard 2.0, which includes Latin characters a-z and A-Z, in addition to letter characters from other languages.
    • Subsequent characters can be:
      • Letters as defined in the Unicode Standard 2.0.
      • Decimal numbers from either Basic Latin or other national scripts.
      • The dollar sign ($), a number sign (#), or an underscore (_).
    • Embedded spaces or special characters are not allowed in instance names. Neither is the backslash (\), a comma (,), a colon (:), or the at sign (@).
  15. Q. What account do I choose as the startup account? Can I change it after installation?

    A: SQL Server and SQL Server Agent are installed as Windows services. Both services require a Windows user account to be set up as startup account. During installation, you can choose which user account will be the startup account. You can assign the same account for both services or different accounts. You can use either the Local System Account or a Domain User Account.

    The local system account does not require a password, does not have network access rights in Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000, and restricts your SQL Server installation from interacting with other servers.

    A domain user account uses Windows Authentication; that is, the same user name and password used to connect to the operating system are also used to connect to SQL Server. A domain user account is typically used because many server-to-server activities can be performed only with a domain user account, such as remote procedure calls, replication, backups to network drives, heterogeneous joins, and SQL Mail. If after installation you need to change the startup account for these services, you can do it either from the Services applet or from SQL Server Enterprise Manager. Detailed instructions are given in SQL Server Books Online under the topics "Setting up Windows Services Accounts", "Services Accounts", and "Changing Passwords and User Accounts".
  16. Q. How do I install the Analysis Services?

    A: To Install Analysis Services on your computer, follow these steps:
    1. Insert the SQL Server 2000 CD in your CD-ROM drive. If the compact disc does not run automatically, double-click Autorun.exe in the root folder of the CD.
    2. Select SQL Server 2000 Components.
    3. On the Install Components screen, select Install Analysis Services.
    4. At the Welcome screen for SQL Server 2000 Analysis Services, click Next.
    5. Follow the directions on the User Information, Software License Agreement, and related screens.
    6. In the Select Components dialog box, select or clear components as needed, and then click Next. If you want to change the default location of the Analysis Services program files, click Browse at Destination Folder and select a folder location.
    7. In the Data Folder Location dialog box, accept or change the default location for data files, and then click Next.
    8. In the Select Program Folder dialog box, accept or change the default settings, and then click Next.
    After this, SQL Server setup installs Analysis Services on your computer.
  17. Q. How do I install English Query?

    A: To install English Query on your computer, follow these steps:

    1. Insert the SQL Server 2000 CD in your CD-ROM drive. If the CD does not run automatically, double-click Autorun.exe in the root folder of the CD.
    2. Select SQL Server 2000 Components.
    3. On the Install Components screen, select Install English Query.
    No further selections are necessary. SQL Server setup installs English Query on your computer.
  18. Q. How do I install only the client tools of SQL Server 2000?

    A. There are two ways to install the Client tools:
    • Use the Installation Definition screen to select the components to include in this installation of SQL Server 2000. If you select Client Tools Only or Connectivity Only, setup proceeds and no additional choices are required, unless you select components when installing client tools.
    • Use the Custom Setup option, and in the Select Components screen, you can choose to install individual subcomponents of Client Management Tools.
  19. Q. Can I install the Microsoft Data Access Components (MDAC) 2.6 version that comes with SQL Server 2000 without actually installing SQL Server 2000?

    A. Yes. MDAC 2.6 has a separate installation and can be installed without installing SQL Server 2000. Just run the Sqlredis.exe program that is located in the MSEQ\x86\ODBC folder on the SQL Server 2000 CD.
  20. Q. Is it possible to have SQL Server 2000 start automatically on computers running Microsoft Windows 98?

    A. Yes. In the SQL Server Service Manager, there is an option called AutoStart Service When OS Starts that lets you do this.
  21. Q. Can I install SQL Server 2000 on a server that already has SQL Server 7.0 installed?

    A: You have two options when performing an installation of SQL Server 2000 on a computer that already has SQL Server 7.0 installed:

    • Setup detects the existing SQL Server 7.0 installation and prompts you to upgrade the existing SQL Server 7.0 program to SQL Server 2000. In this case, the upgraded SQL Server 2000 will become the default instance. -or-

    • Retain the existing SQL Server 7.0 installation and proceed with the SQL Server 2000 installation to set up a named instance of SQL Server 2000. In this case, the SQL Server 7.0 installation will act as the default instance.
    In both cases, the SQL Server 7.0 Tools and Management utilities are replaced by the SQL Server 2000 Tools and Management utilities. During the SQL Server 2000 installation, the SQL Server 7.0 tools, executables, COM components, and DLL files are replaced with redirectors so that the SQL Server 2000 version always starts, even when you start the tools from the SQL Server 7.0 Program group.

    NOTE: Do not install SQL Server 2000 on a SQL Server 6.5 or SQL Server 7.0 cluster.
  22. Q. Can I install SQL Server 2000 on a computer that already has SQL Server 6.5 installed?

    A: Yes, there are two ways to install SQL Server 2000 on a computer that already has SQL Server 6.5 installed:
    • Install SQL Server 2000 as a named instance. In this case, the SQL Server 6.5 acts as the default instance and both SQL Server 2000 and SQL Server 6.5 will be running at the same time.
    • Install SQL Server 2000 as a default instance. In this case, you can have only SQL Server 6.5 or SQL Server 2000 running at any point in time. You can use the Version Switch utility to switch between the two versions.
  23. Q. Can I have SQL Server 6.5, SQL Server 7.0, and SQL Server 2000 all installed on a single computer?

    A: Yes, you can have all three versions installed with the following conditions:
    • The default instance should be either SQL Server 6.5 or SQL Server 7.0, which can be toggled by using the Version Switch utility.
    • The named instances can be SQL Server 2000.
    • All three versions cannot be running at the same time.
  24. Q. Can I perform a remote installation?

    A. Yes. The Computer Name screen of the SQL Server setup provides the option of selecting the local computer, a remote computer, or when installing clustering, a virtual server. However, note that all prerequisites must first be installed on the remote computer before beginning the installation. For more information on remote setup, see the "Remote Setup Information" topic in SQL Server Books Online.
  25. Q. How do I perform an unattended install of SQL Server 2000?

    A. If you are planning to install identical installations of SQL Server 2000 on several computers, or if you need to install SQL Server 2000 on computers that you cannot administer remotely, you can use the unattended install option. The most important component of an unattended install is the setup initialization file. The setup initialization file can be obtained in any of the following ways:

    • The SQL Server 2000 CD contains several sample .iss files (Sqlins.iss, Sqlcli.iss, Sqlcst.iss) for the different types of installations.
    • Each time that you perform an interactive SQL Server 2000 setup, it records all of the selections you make and saves them in the Setup.iss file found in the system root folder.
    • You can use the Record Unattended .ISS file option in the Advanced Options screen to create a completely customized Setup.iss file.
    After you have the .iss file, you can perform the unattended install by starting the Setupsql.exe program with the appropriate parameters. For information on the complete process and other details, see the "Performing an Unattended Installation" topic in SQL Server 2000 Books Online.
  26. Q. What do I do if the registry entries related to SQL Server 2000 are corrupted?

    A. Information related to SQL Server 2000 setup and minimal configuration information is stored under the following registry key:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Microsoft SQL Server
    You may encounter problems using SQL Server 2000 if the information stored here is tampered with or corrupted. You can use the Registry Rebuild option to restore this information in the registry. To rebuild the SQL Server registry entries, follow these steps:
    1. Insert the SQL Server 2000 CD in your CD-ROM drive. If the CD does not run automatically, double-click Autorun.exe in the root folder of the CD.
    2. Select SQL Server 2000 Components, select Install Database Server, and then click Next at the Welcome screen of the SQL Server Installation Wizard.
    3. In the Computer Name dialog box, click Next.
    4. In the Installation Selection dialog box, click Advanced options. In the Advanced Options dialog box, click Registry Rebuild, and then click Next.
    5. A message informs you that Setup rebuilds the registry based on information you supply in the subsequent screens.

      CAUTION: The setup options you enter must be the same choices that you entered during the initial installation. If you do not know, or are unsure of, this information, do not use this registry rebuild process. Instead, you must uninstall and reinstall SQL Server to restore the registry.
    6. To prepare for the registry rebuild, enter the same information and options that you entered during the initial installation of SQL Server in the setup screens as they appear. When you have finished, the registry rebuild will occur.

      NOTE: Rebuilding the registry includes recopying external components such as MDAC and MS DTC.
  27. Q. How do I rebuild the master database?

    A: To rebuild the master database of a SQL Server 2000 instance, use the Rebuild Master Utility, Rebuildm.exe. You must rebuild the master database to fix corrupted master databases or to change collation settings for the instance. Detailed steps and information are available in the "How to rebuild the master database" topic in SQL Server Books Online. Also, be aware of the issue that is mentioned in the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    273572 BUG: Rebuildm.exe utility stops responding when source directory is on a CD
  28. Q. How do I uninstall SQL Server 2000?

    A. Each instance of SQL Server 2000 that is installed on a computer must be uninstalled separately. You can perform the uninstall in either of the following ways:
    • Using the Add/Remove Programs application in Control Panel, choose the SQL Server 2000 instance and click Remove.
    • Use the Uninstall option in the setup program. To reach this option, follow these steps:
      1. Click SQL Server 2000 Components, and then click Install Database Server.
      2. Click to select Local Computer, and then click to select Upgrade, Remove, or Add Components to an existing instance of SQL Server.
      3. Click to select Default or select the instance you want to uninstall in the Instance Name drop down box, and then click to select Uninstall your existing installation.
    After the uninstall program is finished, you need to clean up the files or folders that were in use during the uninstall. If you cannot use this method to remove SQL Server 2000, you can manually remove the instance of SQL Server 2000 by following the steps presented in the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    290991 How to manually remove SQL Server 2000 default, named, or virtual instance
  29. Q. Can I rename a server after installing SQL Server 2000?

    A: Yes, you can rename a server after the installation of SQL Server 2000. When the SQL Server service starts for the first time after the name change, it automatically recognizes the change and resets the computer name. You do not need to run setup again to reset this value. However, you must perform several additional configuration steps. To correct the sysservers system table, you should manually run the following procedures.

    For a default instance:
    sp_dropserver <old_servername>
    go
    sp_addserver <new_servername> , local
    go
    						
    For a named instance:
    sp_dropserver <old_servername\instancename>
    go
    sp_addserver <new_servername\instancename> , local
    go
    					
  30. Q. When I run SQL Server Setup, why do I receive a message asking me to close all ODBC components?

    A. SQL Server 2000 Setup installs Microsoft Data Access Components (MDAC) 2.6, which installs later versions of ODBC components. Therefore, all applications that use ODBC must be closed in order for the MDAC installation to succeed. Applications that use ODBC include Microsoft Internet Information Server (IIS), Microsoft Systems Management Server, Microsoft Access, and Oracle database applications.
  31. Q. I receive the following error message during the SQL Server 2000 install. How do I proceed?
    Error running script: messages.sql (1)
    Setup Failed.
    A. For detailed information on the cause of this error and the steps to fix it, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    300676 FIX: The Setup program may fail when you try to upgrade to SQL Server 2000 and Setup runs the Messages.sql script
  32. Q. I received the following error when I start the SQL Server 2000 setup. What can I do to get past this message?
    A previous program installation created pending file operations on the installation computer. You must restart the computer before running setup.
    A. There are various steps that you can take to fix this. For detailed information on troubleshooting this message, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    312995 SQL Server 2000 installation fails with "...previous program installation..." error message
  33. Q. When I start the installation, I receive the following message. What does this mean?
    Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Edition Server Component is not supported on this operating system. Only client components will be available for installation.
    -or-
    Microsoft SQL Server Standard Edition Server Component is not supported on this operating system. Only client components will be available for installation.
    A. This message indicates that you are trying to install a SQL Server 2000 edition that is not supported on the operating system of the computer on which you are attempting the install. See question 1 above for a list of editions and the operating systems that support them. To determine which operating system version you are running, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    262255 How to determine the version of Windows 2000 that is being used
  34. Q. When I run the SQL Server 2000 setup, it just hangs. What do I do?

    A. In this situation, minimize the Setup window (and other windows if necessary) to see whether there are any message boxes relating to File Copy or File Sharing. You must respond to any such messages before Setup can proceed.
  35. Q. What should I do if the installation of SQL Server 2000 is unsuccessful?

    A. If you have an unsuccessful installation, you can examine two files to help determine what went wrong. The Sqlstp.log file, which is located in the Windows directory, gives detailed information on what setup is doing and contains all errors encountered during setup. Reviewing this file will give you a better understanding of where setup fails and why.

    During the configuration portion of setup, SQL Server setup runs an application called Cnfgsvr.exe to configure the SQL Server. This application starts SQL Server, connects to it, and then runs the initial installation scripts. Any error encountered during this process is also written to the Sqlstp.log file; however, you should also review the SQL Server error log, named "Errorlog" with no file extension, located by default in the Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\Mssql\Log directory. This error log contains errors that SQL Server encounters when setup attempts to start SQL Server, which may provide further insight into the failure.

    If you cannot determine the cause of the Setup failure, save the two files just mentioned and call Microsoft Product Support Services (PSS) to speak to a SQL Server Support Professional who will help you to resolve your problem. Note that when the Setup application fails, it rolls back all changes to the file system, which includes removing any copied files and changes that were made to the registry.

    One other component that you might want to examine is the Microsoft Data Access Components (MDAC) setup, which is launched as part of the SQL Server 2000 setup. SQL Server 2000 setup installs MDAC 2.6. The MDAC setup creates a separate log file named Dasetup.log; you can review this log file and make sure that there are no issues with the MDAC setup. If you notice any problems with the MDAC installation, follow the steps in the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base for a successful installation of the MDAC components:
    232060 Troubleshooting guide for MDAC setup issues
    After this, you can try to install SQL Server 2000 again. For additional information on MDAC, see the following Microsoft Web site:
    http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/aa336295.aspx

Didn't see an answer to your question? Visit the Microsoft SQL Server Newsgroups at the following Microsoft Web site:
http://www.microsoft.com/communities/newsgroups/en-us/
Microsoft technical communities provide opportunities to interact with Microsoft employees, experts, and your peers in order to share knowledge and news about Microsoft products and related technologies. These technical communities provide a variety of ways to access answers to questions, to access solutions to problems, and to share your own expertise. These technical communities are located at the following Microsoft Web site:
http://www.microsoft.com/communities
Comments about this or other Microsoft SQL Server Knowledge Base articles? Drop us a note at SQLKB@Microsoft.com

Properties

Article ID: 257716 - Last Review: June 22, 2014 - Revision: 14.0
Applies to
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Standard Edition
Keywords: 
kbsqlsetup kbinfo KB257716

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