Parental consent and Microsoft child accounts

Applies to: Microsoft account

 

Depending on your region and the service you’re trying to access, a parent or guardian’s permission may be required for a child to create a Microsoft account. This is in accordance with certain regulations that promote child safety along with greater visibility and management of data that is stored about your child online.

A Microsoft account is used for Microsoft services such as Outlook, Skype, Office, and Xbox. Learn more about Microsoft accounts.

Examples of regulations that require parental consent include the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) in the United States, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in the European Union, the Personal Information Protection Act (PIPA) in South Korea, and similar regulations passed by individual governments.

Helping kids explore technology safely is one of Microsoft’s top goals, so in addition to complying with these important regulations, we offer family settings that include content restrictions, screen time, and activity monitoring through the Microsoft family service that lives on account.microsoft.com/family. It’s where you’ll go to manage your child’s Microsoft account.

Tell me more about Microsoft family including setting up content restrictions

Learn about adding child accounts to Microsoft family

Learn about changing safety and privacy settings on Xbox One

Why does Microsoft charge a small fee as part of the consent process for a child account?


Microsoft takes steps to verify that an adult is giving a child permission to use a Microsoft account. One of the commonly used methods that’s approved under regulation is to charge a small nonrefundable fee to a credit card or debit card that has a CVV number. You can deposit the fee into your Microsoft account or your child’s new Microsoft account, and don’t worry, the credit or debit card will not be added to your child’s account.

I don't have a credit or debit card. How can I verify my age?

You can submit an age verification form online. Find out how

Will I be charged for each child I sign up?

No. Once you’ve confirmed that you’re an adult, you can use your Microsoft account to approve additional child accounts at no charge.

Can I remove my credit or debit card after verifying I'm an adult and completing parental consent?

You can easily remove your payment options online. Here's how:

  1. Sign in to your Payment options page with your Microsoft account.
  2. Select Remove under the payment option you want to remove.

I'm an adult but I'm being asked for parental consent. What do I do?

The birthdate on your account indicates that you're underage. You can correct your birthdate by providing proof that you're an adult. Follow the steps to provide a credit or debit card for validation or submit a form using the process described in Age verification for parental consent.

I use this account as part of my business but am being asked for parental consent. What do I do?

If you're being asked for parental consent, the birthdate on your account indicates that you're underage. You can correct your birthdate by providing proof that you're an adult. Follow the steps to provide a credit or debit card for validation or submit a form using the process described in Age verification for parental consent.

Why do I get an error message when I'm trying to provide consent for my child?


Here are some reasons you may not be able to provide consent:

Your child's account is in a different region than yours

To comply with regional regulations around data protection, the child and the adult providing consent need to be in the same regulatory region. Here's how to update your region:

  1. Go to Your info on account.microsoft.com and sign in.
  2. Select Edit country/region.
  3. Update your country or region to match your child's, then make sure the other settings are up to date. Select Save to finish up.

Your child's account is in a different Microsoft family than yours

When Microsoft has any indication that the child has already identified a parent or guardian, we prevent other users from granting consent to the account. You can check which accounts are associated with your child’s account by having your child sign in to account.microsoft.com/family.

You may need to sign in with a different Microsoft account

If you’ve used a Microsoft account in the past to manage your child’s account, then you’ll need to use that same account to give them consent. You can check which accounts have access to your child’s account by having your child sign in to account.microsoft.com/family. You’ll see email addresses listed under the names of each member of their Microsoft family.

Your child already received consent

If your child sent requests to another parent or multiple guardians for consent, someone else may have already provided consent for them. Have your child sign in to account.microsoft.com/family to see which accounts are associated with theirs.

When does my child gain control of their Microsoft account?


As your child gets older, they’ll reach certain ages where regulations require that they can manage certain aspects of their account, including:

Activity and location info and personal data

Once your child reaches the age of majority (18 years old in most regions), they'll gain control of their profile information and the ability to decide who receives activity and location data from their account. Kids of all ages can make Subject Access Requests (SAR) to do things like request the export of all data stored about them by Microsoft.

Xbox Live

Kids are required to have parental consent to access Xbox Live on a console until they reach the age of majority (18 years old in most regions), at which point they will have full control over their account.

Family settings

Most family settings will apply to your child until they reach the age of majority (18 years old in most regions). Once your child has reached the age of majority, they can allow other adults in the family to view their activity reports, see their location on a map, or manage their device health.

Can I remove consent for my child's Microsoft account?


Yes. If for any reason you no longer want your child to have a Microsoft account, visit account.microsoft.com/family and sign in with your Microsoft account. Scroll down and select Manage my child’s profile info, find your child, then select Remove consent for this child’s account.

If you want to remove your child completely from your Microsoft family, see Remove members from your Microsoft family for more info.